Commands by AndrewM (2)

What's this?

commandlinefu.com is the place to record those command-line gems that you return to again and again. That way others can gain from your CLI wisdom and you from theirs too. All commands can be commented on, discussed and voted up or down.

Share Your Commands


Check These Out

Verify if user account exists in Linux / Unix

Output a list of svn repository entities to xml file
I use this to pull the last commit date for everything in my repo, so I can tell the client which files haven't been touched or updated since the repo was created. Another way to do it is to use svn log, but that does not pull the "kind" attribute. It does, however, give you the commit message. Both are very useful.

Which processes are listening on a specific port (e.g. port 80)
swap out "80" for your port of interest. Can use port number or named ports e.g. "http"

Compare copies of a file with md5

LVM2 Reduce
Just the commands for the lvreduce I keep forgetting.

Reads a CD/DVD and creates an dvdisaster iso image with the advanced RS02 method.

python2 -m CGIHTTPServer
In case you need to test some CGI scripts this does the job. It also has the functionality of a http server. Enjoy!

Get MX records for a domain

shutdown pc in 4 hours without needing to keep terminal open / user logged in.
This way, you can specify how many hours in which you want your machine to shut down.

Create backup copy of file, adding suffix of the date of the file modification (NOT today's date)
When I go to change a configuration file I always like to make a backup first. You can use "cp -p" to preserve the modification time, but it gets confusing to have file.prev, file.prev2, etc. So I like to add a YYMMDD suffix that shows when the file was last changed. "stat -c %Y" gives you the modification time in epoch seconds, then "date -d @" converts that to whatever format you specify in your "+format" string.


Stay in the loop…

Follow the Tweets.

Every new command is wrapped in a tweet and posted to Twitter. Following the stream is a great way of staying abreast of the latest commands. For the more discerning, there are Twitter accounts for commands that get a minimum of 3 and 10 votes - that way only the great commands get tweeted.

» http://twitter.com/commandlinefu
» http://twitter.com/commandlinefu3
» http://twitter.com/commandlinefu10

Subscribe to the feeds.

Use your favourite RSS aggregator to stay in touch with the latest commands. There are feeds mirroring the 3 Twitter streams as well as for virtually every other subset (users, tags, functions,…):

Subscribe to the feed for: