Commands by Ben (2)

  • Find Word docs by filename in the current directory, convert each of them to plain text using antiword (taking care of spaces in filenames), then grep for a search term in the particular file. (Of course, it's better to save your data as plain text to make for easier grepping, but that's not always possible.) Requires antiword. Or you can modify it to use catdoc instead.


    3
    find . -iname '*filename*.doc' | { while read line; do antiword "$line"; done; } | grep -C4 search_term;
    Ben · 2009-07-28 15:49:58 1
  • manview searches man pages on the internets in case the man command doesn't work for some reason or if you think the man pages in Cornell's flavor of Solaris might differ from yours. It dumps the manpage info from lynx to less, so it ends up looking remarkably like a real manpage. Put it in your .bash_profile or .bashrc, and then you can use it like a regular command: typing "manview ssh" will give you the manpage for ssh.


    0
    manview() { lynx -dump -accept_all_cookies 'http://www.csuglab.cornell.edu/cgi-bin/adm/man.cgi?section=all&topic='"$1" | less; }
    Ben · 2009-03-11 19:02:11 1

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