Commands by Blagus (1)

What's this?

commandlinefu.com is the place to record those command-line gems that you return to again and again. That way others can gain from your CLI wisdom and you from theirs too. All commands can be commented on, discussed and voted up or down.

Share Your Commands


Check These Out

extract email adresses from some file (or any other pattern)
This will catch most separators in the section of the email: dot . dash - underscore _ plus + (added for gmail) ... and the basic dash '-' of host names.

Sort lines on clipboard
Does the same thing in environments where you have "xclip" instead of "pbpaste"/"pbpate" and "pbcopy".

"Pretty print" $PATH, separate path per line
from: http://www.unix.com/shell-programming-and-scripting/28047-split-print-path.html

Convert CSV to JSON
Replace 'csv_file.csv' with your filename.

Know which modules are loaded on an Apache server
This let you know which modules has loaded the Apache server, very useful to know if the mod_rewrite is ready to use.

sends your internal IP by email
This is useful if you have need to do port forwarding and your router doesn't assign static IPs, you can add it to a script in a cron job that checks if you IP as recently changed or with a trigger script. This was tested on Mac OSX.

Get ethX mac addresses
I much prefer using /sbin/ip over /sbin/ifconfig for most everything. I find the interface and output to be much more consistent and it has many abilities that ifconfig, route, etc. do not. To get the mac address for only one interface, add 'show dev [interface]' to the 'ip link' part of the command: ip link show dev eth0 | grep 'link/ether' | awk '{print $2}' . Also, both this command and the ifconfig one do not require root access to run, so the sudo is not necessary.

Convert the contents of a directory listing into a colon-separated environment variable
Useful for making a CLASSPATH out of a list of JAR files, for example. Also: export CLASSPATH=.:$(find ./lib -name '*.jar' -printf '%p:')

wc in perl

Convert seconds to [DD:][HH:]MM:SS
Converts any number of seconds into days, hours, minutes and seconds. sec2dhms() { declare -i SS="$1" D=$(( SS / 86400 )) H=$(( SS % 86400 / 3600 )) M=$(( SS % 3600 / 60 )) S=$(( SS % 60 )) [ "$D" -gt 0 ] && echo -n "${D}:" [ "$H" -gt 0 ] && printf "%02g:" "$H" printf "%02g:%02g\n" "$M" "$S" }


Stay in the loop…

Follow the Tweets.

Every new command is wrapped in a tweet and posted to Twitter. Following the stream is a great way of staying abreast of the latest commands. For the more discerning, there are Twitter accounts for commands that get a minimum of 3 and 10 votes - that way only the great commands get tweeted.

» http://twitter.com/commandlinefu
» http://twitter.com/commandlinefu3
» http://twitter.com/commandlinefu10

Subscribe to the feeds.

Use your favourite RSS aggregator to stay in touch with the latest commands. There are feeds mirroring the 3 Twitter streams as well as for virtually every other subset (users, tags, functions,…):

Subscribe to the feed for: