Commands by Boojum (2)

  • Scan pages in, clean them up in an image editor, save to individual files. Use this command to convert each page to PDF. Combine in Acrobat Professional, and use the built-in OCR with the "Searchable Image (Exact)" option. Gives excellent image quality and file size (avoids awful JPEG image recompression that Acrobat and other OCR systems tend to do.)


    3
    convert pagexxx.png -filter Cubic -resize 200% -threshold 50% -compress Group4 pagexxx.tiff; tiff2pdf -z -p letter -ro -x 1200 -y 1200 -o pagexxx.pdf pagexxx.tiff
    Boojum · 2009-02-05 20:14:06 0
  • Use this to turn a page with snippets of equations into vector paths that Adobe Illustrator can handle without choking on font embedding and substitution issues. Good for keeping fonts consistent when labeling charts and diagrams. Also good for embedding formulas into diagrams.


    0
    gs -dNOCACHE -dNOPAUSE -dBATCH -dSAFER -sDEVICE=epswrite -dEPSCrop -sOutputFile=out.eps in.pdf
    Boojum · 2009-02-05 20:06:40 0

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Bare Metal IRC Client
Uses the extremely cool utilities netcat and expect. "expect" logs in & monitors for server PING checks. When a PING is received it sends the PONG needed to stay connected. IRC commands to try: HELP, TIME, MOTD, JOIN and PRIVMSG The "/" in front of IRC commands are not needed, e.g. type JOIN #mygroup Learn about expect: http://tldp.org/LDP/LGNET/issue48/fisher.html The sample output shows snippets from an actual IRC session. Please click UP button if you like it!

Show numerical values for each of the 256 colors in bash
Same as http://www.commandlinefu.com/commands/view/5876, but for bash. This will show a numerical value for each of the 256 colors in bash. Everything in the command is a bash builtin, so it should run on any platform where bash is installed. Prints one color per line. If someone is interested in formatting the output, paste the alternative.

sudo for entire line (including pipes and redirects)
USAGE: $ sudor your command This command uses a dirty hack with history, so be sure you not turned it off. WARNING! This command behavior differ from other commands. It more like text macro, so you shouldn't use it in subshells, non-interactive sessions, other functions/aliases and so on. You shouldn't pipe into sudor (any string that prefixes sudor will be removed), but if you really want, use this commands: $ proceed_sudo () { sudor_command="`HISTTIMEFORMAT=\"\" history 1 | sed -r -e 's/^.*?sudor//' -e 's/\"/\\\"/g'`" ; pre_sudor_command="`history 1 | cut -d ' ' -f 5- | sed -r -e 's/sudor.*$//' -e 's/\"/\\\"/g'`"; if [ -n "${pre_sudor_command/ */}" ] ; then eval "${pre_sudor_command%| *}" | sudo sh -c "$sudor_command"; else sudo sh -c "$sudor_command" ;fi ;}; alias sudor="proceed_sudo # "

Replace all tabs with spaces in an application
Note that this assumes the application is an SVN checkout and so we have to throw away all the .svn files before making the substitution.

Show an application's environment variables

Convert seconds to [DD:][HH:]MM:SS
Converts any number of seconds into days, hours, minutes and seconds. sec2dhms() { declare -i SS="$1" D=$(( SS / 86400 )) H=$(( SS % 86400 / 3600 )) M=$(( SS % 3600 / 60 )) S=$(( SS % 60 )) [ "$D" -gt 0 ] && echo -n "${D}:" [ "$H" -gt 0 ] && printf "%02g:" "$H" printf "%02g:%02g\n" "$M" "$S" }

BASH: Print shell variable into AWK
Alternatively: export MyVAR=84; awk '{ print ENVIRON["MyVAR"] }'

Gets directory and files tree listing from a FTP-server
Creates a file with contents like `du -a`, only it is remote server filesystem hierarchy. Very usefull then for grep-ing without remote connection.

Find usb device in realtime
Using this command you can track a moment when usb device was attached.

get all Amazon cloud (amazonws etc) ipv6 subnets


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