Commands by Boojum (2)

  • Scan pages in, clean them up in an image editor, save to individual files. Use this command to convert each page to PDF. Combine in Acrobat Professional, and use the built-in OCR with the "Searchable Image (Exact)" option. Gives excellent image quality and file size (avoids awful JPEG image recompression that Acrobat and other OCR systems tend to do.)


    3
    convert pagexxx.png -filter Cubic -resize 200% -threshold 50% -compress Group4 pagexxx.tiff; tiff2pdf -z -p letter -ro -x 1200 -y 1200 -o pagexxx.pdf pagexxx.tiff
    Boojum · 2009-02-05 20:14:06 0
  • Use this to turn a page with snippets of equations into vector paths that Adobe Illustrator can handle without choking on font embedding and substitution issues. Good for keeping fonts consistent when labeling charts and diagrams. Also good for embedding formulas into diagrams.


    0
    gs -dNOCACHE -dNOPAUSE -dBATCH -dSAFER -sDEVICE=epswrite -dEPSCrop -sOutputFile=out.eps in.pdf
    Boojum · 2009-02-05 20:06:40 0

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Print every Nth line
Sometimes commands give you too much feedback. Perhaps 1/100th might be enough. If so, every() is for you. $ my_verbose_command | every 100 will print every 100th line of output. Specifically, it will print lines 100, 200, 300, etc If you use a negative argument it will print the *first* of a block, $ my_verbose_command | every -100 It will print lines 1, 101, 201, 301, etc The function wraps up this useful sed snippet: $ ... | sed -n '0~100p' don't print anything by default $ sed -n starting at line 0, then every hundred lines ( ~100 ) print. $ '0~100p' There's also some bash magic to test if the number is negative: we want character 0, length 1, of variable N. $ ${N:0:1} If it *is* negative, strip off the first character ${N:1} is character 1 onwards (second actual character).

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Print a row of characters across the terminal
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Show a 4-way scrollable process tree with full details.
If you want a visual representation of the parent/child relationships between processes, this is one easy way to do it. It's useful in debugging collections of shell scripts, because it provides something like a call traceback. When a shell script breaks, just remember "awwfux".


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