Commands by Brandonccx (1)

  • Only show a short of important information inline ( include branch info ), and color this log tree. Show Sample Output


    3
    git log --graph --pretty=format:'%Cred%h%Creset -%C(yellow)%d%Creset %s %Cgreen(%cr)%Cblue - %cn %Creset' --abbrev-commit --date=relative
    Brandonccx · 2015-08-12 07:11:15 0

What's this?

commandlinefu.com is the place to record those command-line gems that you return to again and again. That way others can gain from your CLI wisdom and you from theirs too. All commands can be commented on, discussed and voted up or down.

Share Your Commands


Check These Out

Automatic ssh Session Logger
A wrapper around ssh to automatically provide logging and session handling. This function runs ssh, which runs screen, which runs script. . The logs and the screen session are stored on the server. This means you can leave a session running and re-attach to it later, or from another machine. . . Requirements: * Log sessions on a remote server * Transparent - nothing extra to type * No installation - nothing to copy to the server beforehand . Features: * Function wrapper delegating to ssh - so nothing to remember - uses .ssh/config as expected - passes your command line option to ssh * Self-contained: no scripts to install on the server * Uses screen(1), so is: - detachable - re-attachable - shareable * Records session using script(1) * Configurable log file location, which may contain variables or whitespace L="$HOME" # local variable L="\$HOME" # server variable L="some space" . Limitations: * Log dir/file may not contain '~' (which would require eval on the server) . . The sessions are named by the local user connecting to the server. Therefore if you detach and re-run the same command you will reconnect to your original session. If you want to connect/share another's session simply run: $ USER=bob ssh [email protected] . The command above is stripped down to an absolute minimum. A fully expanded and annotated version is available as a Gist (git pastebin): https://gist.github.com/flatcap/3c42326abeb1197ee714 . If you want to add timing info to script, change the command to: $ ssh(){ L="\$HOME/logs/$(date +%F_%H:%M)-$USER";/usr/bin/ssh -t "[email protected]" "mkdir -p \"${L%/*}\";screen -xRRS $USER script --timing=\"$L-timing\" -f \"$L\"";}

Display or use a random file from current directory via a small bash one-liner
An other way to run it ( playing a random file ending with avi, flv or mpeg ) from a specified dir and a specified type of extension : making MOVIE array with a glob : $ MOVIE=( /PATH/TO/MY/FAVORITE/MOVIES/*.{avi,flv,mpeg} ) playing the random file from a random key from the array $ mplayer ${MOVIE[ RANDOM % ( ${#i[@]} + 1 ) ]]} I use only globs and a bash array. I use GNU bash, version 3.2.48

Get playlist for Livestream on YouTube

draw rhomb

whois surfing my web ?

Print a row of characters across the terminal
shorter than alternative

Calculate days on which Friday the 13th occurs (inspired from the work of the user justsomeguy)
Friday is the 5th day of the week, monday is the 1st. Output may be affected by locale.

Converts all pngs in a folder to webp using all available cores
As an alternative to the above command, this one ditches the unnecessary and complicated for loop in favor of a way faster multi-core approach for a task that's more CPU than I/O intensive, making it a perfect suite for GNU parallel

identify exported sonames in a path
This provides a list of shared object names (sonames) that are exported by a given tree. This is usually useful to make sure that a given required dependency (NEEDED entry) is present in a firmware image tree. The shorter (usable) version for it would be $ scanelf -RBSq -F "+S#f" But I used the verbose parameters in the command above, for explanation.

To print a specific line from a file
You can get one specific line during any procedure. Very interesting to be used when you know what line you want.


Stay in the loop…

Follow the Tweets.

Every new command is wrapped in a tweet and posted to Twitter. Following the stream is a great way of staying abreast of the latest commands. For the more discerning, there are Twitter accounts for commands that get a minimum of 3 and 10 votes - that way only the great commands get tweeted.

» http://twitter.com/commandlinefu
» http://twitter.com/commandlinefu3
» http://twitter.com/commandlinefu10

Subscribe to the feeds.

Use your favourite RSS aggregator to stay in touch with the latest commands. There are feeds mirroring the 3 Twitter streams as well as for virtually every other subset (users, tags, functions,…):

Subscribe to the feed for: