Commands by CamJN (1)

  • It works best as part of a function, such as the following: MUSICROOT=~/Music function fplay { if [ $1 = '-v' ]; then shift 1 find -E $MUSICROOT -type f -iname "*$**" -iregex '.*\.(3g[2|p]|aac|ac3|adts|aif[c|f]?|amr|and|au|caf|m4[a|r|v]|mp[1-4|a]|mpeg[0,9]?|sd2|wav)' -print -exec afplay "{}" \; & else find -E $MUSICROOT -type f -iname "*$**" -iregex '.*\.(3g[2|p]|aac|ac3|adts|aif[c|f]?|amr|and|au|caf|m4[a|r|v]|mp[1-4|a]|mpeg[0,9]?|sd2|wav)' -exec afplay "{}" \; & fi }


    1
    find -E ~/Music -type f -iname "*search terms*" -iregex '.*\.(3g[2|p]|aac|ac3|adts|aif[c|f]?|amr|and|au|caf|m4[a|r|v]|mp[1-4|a]|mpeg[0,9]?|sd2|wav)' -exec afplay "{}" \; &
    CamJN · 2010-07-30 22:26:03 0

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