Commands by CherFresne (0)

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Synchronise a file from a remote server
You will be prompted for a password unless you have your public keys set-up.

Which processes are listening on a specific port (e.g. port 80)
swap out "80" for your port of interest. Can use port number or named ports e.g. "http"

In place line numbering
Add permanent line numbers to a file without creating a temp file. The rm command deletes file10 while the nl command works on the open file descriptor of file10 which it outputs into a new file again named file10. The new file10 will now be numbered in the same directory with the same file name and content as before, but it will in fact be a new file, using (ls -i) to show its inode number will prove this.

show the real times iso of epochs for a given column
When you have one of those (log)files that only has epoch for time (since no one will ever look at them as a date) this is a way to get the human readable date/time and do further inspection. Mostly perl-fu :-/

Find the package that installed a command

Write comments to your history.
A null operation with the name 'comment', allowing comments to be written to HISTFILE. Prepending '#' to a command will *not* write the command to the history file, although it will be available for the current session, thus '#' is not useful for keeping track of comments past the current session.

Rename all files in lower case

check open ports without netstat or lsof

Recall last argument of previous command
!$ recalls the last argument of the previous command. This is very useful when you have to operate several operations on the same file for example.

Find common groups between two users


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