Commands by Creek (3)

What's this?

commandlinefu.com is the place to record those command-line gems that you return to again and again. That way others can gain from your CLI wisdom and you from theirs too. All commands can be commented on, discussed and voted up or down.

Share Your Commands


Check These Out

Change attributes of files so you can edit them
I had problems in Ubuntu while trying to edit /etc/resolv.conf, even with sudo I couldn't make any change. After a 2 minutes search on google I found this command. Hope someone finds it useful. It works like chmod, with + and - to denote which attributes are being added and which are being removed. See other attributes on man pages or on wikipedia http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chattr

Find usb device in realtime
Using this command you can track a moment when usb device was attached.

Most used commands from history (without perl)
I copied this (let's be honest) somewhere on internet and I just made it as a function ready to be used as alias. It shows the 10 most used commands from history. This seems to be just another "most used commands from history", but hey.. this is a function!!! :D

5 Which Aliases
5 helpful aliases for using the which utility, specifically for the GNU which (2.16 tested) that is included in coreutils. Which is run first for a command. Same as type builtin minus verbosity $ alias which='{ command alias; command declare -f; } | command which --read-functions --read-alias' Which (a)lias $ alias whicha='command alias | command which --read-alias' Which (f)unction $ alias whichf='command declare -f | command which --read-functions' Which e(x)ecutable file in PATH $ alias whichx='command which' Which (all) alias, function, builtin, and files in PATH $ alias whichall='{ command alias; command declare -f; } | command which --read-functions --read-alias -a' # From my .bash_profile http://www.askapache.com/linux-unix/bash_profile-functions-advanced-shell.html

mailx to send mails from console
It is the best way i found to send a mail from the console in my centos server.

The program listening on port 8080 through IPv6

bash or tcsh redirect both to stdout and to a file
When plumbers use pipes, they sometimes need a T-joint. The Unix equivalent to this is 'tee'. The -a flag tells 'tee' to append to the file, rather than clobbering it. Tested on bash and tcsh.

Convert seconds to [DD:][HH:]MM:SS
Converts any number of seconds into days, hours, minutes and seconds. sec2dhms() { declare -i SS="$1" D=$(( SS / 86400 )) H=$(( SS % 86400 / 3600 )) M=$(( SS % 3600 / 60 )) S=$(( SS % 60 )) [ "$D" -gt 0 ] && echo -n "${D}:" [ "$H" -gt 0 ] && printf "%02g:" "$H" printf "%02g:%02g\n" "$M" "$S" }

Find usb device in realtime
Using this command you can track a moment when usb device was attached.

Randomize lines in a file
Works in sort (GNU coreutils) 7.4, don't know when it was implemented but sometime the last 6 years.


Stay in the loop…

Follow the Tweets.

Every new command is wrapped in a tweet and posted to Twitter. Following the stream is a great way of staying abreast of the latest commands. For the more discerning, there are Twitter accounts for commands that get a minimum of 3 and 10 votes - that way only the great commands get tweeted.

» http://twitter.com/commandlinefu
» http://twitter.com/commandlinefu3
» http://twitter.com/commandlinefu10

Subscribe to the feeds.

Use your favourite RSS aggregator to stay in touch with the latest commands. There are feeds mirroring the 3 Twitter streams as well as for virtually every other subset (users, tags, functions,…):

Subscribe to the feed for: