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Search for a string inside all files in the current directory
shorter typing with no need to use xargs.

unrar all part1 files in a directory

Create and replay macros in vim
You can record, then replay a series of keystrokes in vim. In command mode 'q', then a letter [a-zA-Z] starts macro recording mode. Enter a series of vim commands. When done, enter command mode again, and press 'q' to stop recording. To replay, enter command mode, then press @{letter}

replace recursive in folder with sed

generate random identicon

Update IP filter for qBittorrent
Downloads Bluetack's level 1 IP blocklist in .p2p format, suitable for various Bittorrent clients.

track flights from the command line
Usage: flight_status airline_code flight_number (optional)_offset_of_departure_date_from_today So for instance, to track a flight which departed yesterday, the optional 3rd parameter should have a value of -1. eg. flight_status ua 3655 -1 output --------- Status: Arrived Departure: San Francisco, CA (SFO) Scheduled: 6:30 AM, Jan 3 Takeoff: 7:18 AM, Jan 3 Term-Gate: Term 1 - 32A Arrival: Newark, NJ (EWR) Scheduled: 2:55 PM, Jan 3 At Gate: 3:42 PM, Jan 3 Term-Gate: Term C - C131 Note: html2text needs to be installed for this command. only tested on ubuntu 9.10

Extract rpm package name, version and release using some fancy sed regex
This command could seem pretty pointless especially when you can get the same result more easily using the rpm builtin queryformat, like: $ rpm -qa --qf "%{NAME} %{VERSION} %{RELEASE}.%{ARCH}\n" | sort | column -t but nonetheless I've learned that sometimes it can be quite interesting trying to explore alternative ways to accomplish the same task (as Perl folks like to say: There's more than one way to do it!)

Escape potential tarbombs
This Anti-TarBomb function makes it easy to unpack a .tar.gz without worrying about the possibility that it will "explode" in your current directory. I've usually always created a temporary folder in which I extracted the tarball first, but I got tired of having to reorganize the files afterwards. Just add this function to your .zshrc / .bashrc and use it like this; $ atb arch1.tar.gz and it will create a folder for the extracted files, if they aren't already in a single folder. This only works for .tar.gz, but it's very easy to edit the function to suit your needs, if you want to extract .tgz, .tar.bz2 or just .tar. More info about tarbombs at http://www.linfo.org/tarbomb.html Tested in zsh and bash. UPDATE: This function works for .tar.gz, .tar.bz2, .tgz, .tbz and .tar in zsh (not working in bash): $ atb() { l=$(tar tf $1); if [ $(echo "$l" | wc -l) -eq $(echo "$l" | grep $(echo "$l" | head -n1) | wc -l) ]; then tar xf $1; else mkdir ${1%.t(ar.gz||ar.bz2||gz||bz||ar)} && tar xf $1 -C ${1%.t(ar.gz||ar.bz2||gz||bz||ar)}; fi ;} UPDATE2: From the comments; bepaald came with a variant that works for .tar.gz, .tar.bz2, .tgz, .tbz and .tar in bash: $ atb() {shopt -s extglob ; l=$(tar tf $1); if [ $(echo "$l" | wc -l) -eq $(echo "$l" | grep $(echo "$l" | head -n1) | wc -l) ]; then tar xf $1; else mkdir ${1%.t@(ar.gz|ar.bz2|gz|bz|ar)} && tar xf $1 -C ${1%.t@(ar.gz|ar.bz2|gz|bz|ar)}; fi ; shopt -u extglob}

list files recursively by size


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