Commands by Dema (1)

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Copy a file using pv and watch its progress
pv allows a user to see the progress of data through a pipeline, by giving information such as time elapsed, percentage completed (with progress bar), current throughput rate, total data transferred, and ETA. (man pv)

Execute a sudo command remotely, without displaying the password
The ssh command alone will execute the sudo command remotely, but the password will be visible in the terminal as you type it. The two stty commands disable the terminal from echoing the password back to you, which makes the remote sudo act as it does locally.

Get a list of the erroring cifs entries in fstab
It disturbs me when my logwatch report tells me a share or machine has disappeared, esp as mount isn't telling me what's gone. This command outputs to stderr the erroring cifs entries from fstab.

Find usb device in realtime
Using this command you can track a moment when usb device was attached.

let the cow suggest some commit messages for you

launch bash without using any letters
I don't know why anyone would use this, I was just messing around tonight and managed to start bash without using any letters and thought I would share. It's pretty simple, first it tries to execute "-" redirecting stderr to stdout which prints the error "bash: -: command not found" to standard output, then I try to execute "bash: -: command not found" which produces the output "bash: bash: -: command not found: command not found". lastly, (on the other side of the semicolon) I use the underscore environment variable which refers to the last command run ("bash: -: command not found") and take out everything after the first ":" character using brace expressions and your left with "bash"

Write comments to your history.
A null operation with the name 'comment', allowing comments to be written to HISTFILE. Prepending '#' to a command will *not* write the command to the history file, although it will be available for the current session, thus '#' is not useful for keeping track of comments past the current session.

reverse-i-search: Search through your command line history
"What it actually shows is going to be dependent on the commands you've previously entered. When you do this, bash looks for the last command that you entered that contains the substring "ls", in my case that was "lsof ...". If the command that bash finds is what you're looking for, just hit Enter to execute it. You can also edit the command to suit your current needs before executing it (use the left and right arrow keys to move through it). If you're looking for a different command, hit Ctrl+R again to find a matching command further back in the command history. You can also continue to type a longer substring to refine the search, since searching is incremental. Note that the substring you enter is searched for throughout the command, not just at the beginning of the command." - http://www.linuxjournal.com/content/using-bash-history-more-efficiently

Translate your terminal into Swedish Chef
Bork, bork, bork! To keep it short, the first terminal line doesn't show a prompt.

du disk top 10
fancy command line ncdu clone


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