Commands by FRUiT (1)

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Create a mirror of a local folder, on a remote server
Create a exact mirror of the local folder "/root/files", on remote server 'remote_server' using SSH command (listening on port 22) (all files & folders on destination server/folder will be deleted)

Printable random characters
Reads psuedorandom bytes from /dev/urandom, filtering out non-printable ones. Other character classes can be used, such as [:alpha:], [:digit:] and [:alnum:]. To get a string of 10 lowercase letters: $ tr -dc '[:lower:]' < /dev/urandom | head -c 10

calculate how much bogomips one cpu core has (assuming you have 4 cores).
on some distro's you have to replace "BogoMIPS" with "bogomips".

Install pip with Proxy
Installs pip packages defining a proxy

Generate list of words and their frequencies in a text file.

watch iptables counters
Watch the number of packets/bytes coming through the firewall. Useful in setting up new iptables rules or chains. Use this output to reorder rules for efficiency.

Create a bash script from last commands
In order to write bash-scripts, I often do the task manually to see how it works. I type ### at the start of my session. The function fetches the commands from the last occurrence of '###', excluding the function call. You could prefix this with a here-document to have a proper script-header. Delete some lines, add a few variables and a loop, and you're ready to go. This function could probably be much shorter...

Traceroute w/TCP to get through firewalls.
man tcptraceroute

wc in perl

Read the output of a command into the buffer in vim
This will append the output of "command" to whatever file you're currently editing in vim. Who else has good vim tricks? :)


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