Commands by Gaia1956 (0)

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Which processes are listening on a specific port (e.g. port 80)
swap out "80" for your port of interest. Can use port number or named ports e.g. "http"

Both view and pipe the file without saving to disk
This is a cool trick to view the contents of the file on /dev/pts/0 (or whatever terminal you're using), and also send the contents of that file to another program by way of an unnamed pipe. All the while, you've not bothered saving any extra data to disk, like you might be tempted to do with sed or grep to filter output.

Debug your makefile
Say your dependencies specified in your Makefile (or dates on your source files) is causing 'make' to skip some source-files (that it should not) or on the other other end, if it is causing make to always build some source-files regardless of dates of target, then above command is handy to find out what 'make' thinks of your date v/s target date-wise or what dependencies are in make's view-point. The egrep part removes the extra noise, that you might want to avoid.

Calculate days on which Friday the 13th occurs (inspired from the work of the user justsomeguy)
Friday is the 5th day of the week, monday is the 1st. Output may be affected by locale.

grep expression (perl regex) to extract all ip addresses from both ip and ifconfig commands output
It uses the following GNU grep options: "-o" which shows only the matching part of the line and "-P" which allows the use of Perl regular expressions.

Use /dev/full to test language I/O-failsafety
The Linux /dev/full file simulates a "disk full" condition, and can be used to verify how a program handles this situation. In particular, several programming language implementations do not print error diagnostics (nor exit with error status) when I/O errors like this occur, unless the programmer has taken additional steps. That is, simple code in these languages does not fail safely. In addition to Perl, C, C++, Tcl, and Lua (for some functions) also appear not to fail safely.

recursive base64 encoding -- Cipher for the Poor ?
Just for fun, I searched a simple way to encrypt some text. Simple base64 encoding seemed a good start so I decided to "amplify" encoding using repeted base64 encoding. Of course, this is not really secure but can be useful to hide datas to most part of humans ;). Do not hesitate to provide better solutions or else.

Find usb device in realtime
Using this command you can track a moment when usb device was attached.

Display laptop battery information

Change timestamp on a file
-a for access time, -m for modification time, -c do not create any files, -t timestamp


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