Commands by GregoryHolmes (0)

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list files recursively by size

Tar - Compress by excluding folders
If you give tar a list of filenames, it will not add the directories, so if you don't care about directory ownership or permissions, you can save some space. Tar will create directories as necessary when extracting. This command is limited by the maximum supported size of the argument list, so if you are trying to tar up the whole OS for instance, you may just get "Argument list too long".

split large video file
i have a large video file, 500+ MB, so i cant upload it to flickr, so to reduce the size i split it into 2 files. the command shows the splitting for the first file, from 0-4 minutes. ss is start time and t is duration (how long you want the output file to be). credit goes to philc: http://ubuntuforums.org/showthread.php?t=480343 NOTE: when i made the second half of the video, i got a *lot* of lines like this: frame= 0 fps= 0 q=0.0 size= 0kB time=10000000000.00 bitrate= 0.0kbit just be patient, it is working =)

An alias to re-run last command with sudo. Similar to "sudo !!"
I didn't come up with this myself, but I always add this to my .bash_aliases file. It's essentially the same idea as running "sudo !!" except it's much easier to type. (You can't just alias "sudo !!", it doesn't really work for reasons I don't understand.) "fc" is a shell built-in for editing and re-running previous commands. The -l flag tells it to display the line rather than edit it, and the -n command tells it to omit the line number. -1 tells it to print the previous line. For more detail: $help fc

Get Hardware UUID in Mac OS X
Formats the output from `ioreg` into XML, then parses the XML with `xmllint`'s xpath feature.

grep (or anything else) many files with multiprocessor power
xargs -P N spawns up to N worker processes. -n 40 means each grep command gets up to 40 file names each on the command line.

Which processes are listening on a specific port (e.g. port 80)
swap out "80" for your port of interest. Can use port number or named ports e.g. "http"

list files recursively by size

check open ports (both ipv4 and ipv6)
While `lsof` will work, why not use the tool designed explicitly for this job? (If not run as root, you will only see the names of PID you own)

Show the total number of changes that every user committed to a Subversion repository
This saves Subversion's log output as XML and then runs an XQuery over it. This is standard XQuery 1.0 and should therefore also work with other XQuery processors. I have tested it with Zorba (http://www.zorba-xquery.com). XQilla (http://xqilla.sourceforge.net) also does it, but you'd have to save the query to a file and then execute "xqilla filename.xq". The query first finds all distinct authors and then, for each author, sums up the number of paths they have changed in each commit. This accounts for commits of multiple changes at once. The indenting space in all lines from the second one seems to be due to a bug in Zorba.


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