Commands by Habitual (3)

What's this?

commandlinefu.com is the place to record those command-line gems that you return to again and again. That way others can gain from your CLI wisdom and you from theirs too. All commands can be commented on, discussed and voted up or down.

Share Your Commands


Check These Out

List all authors of a particular git project
This should work even if the output format changes.

Print a monthly calendar with today's date highlighted
The cal command is handy, but sometimes you want to quickly see today's date highlighted. That's why I came up with this quick command. Much like http://www.commandlinefu.com/commands/view/1342/show-this-months-calendar-with-todays-date-highlighted but cleaner and more succinct.

Search recursively to find a word or phrase in certain file types, such as C code
I have a bash alias for this command line and find it useful for searching C code for error messages. The -H tells grep to print the filename. you can omit the -i to match the case exactly or keep the -i for case-insensitive matching. This find command find all .c and .h files

Identify long lines in a file
This command displays a list of lines that are longer than 72 characters. I use this command to identify those lines in my scripts and cut them short the way I like it.

Clear mistyped passwords from password prompt
Type ^u at password prompt to clear a mistyped password.

continuously print string as if being entered from the keyboard
Cycles continuously through a string printing each character with a random delay less than 1 second. First parameter is min, 2nd is max. Example: 1 3 means sleep random .1 to .3. Experiment with different values. The 3rd parameter is the string. The sleep will help with battery life/power consumption. $ cycle 1 3 $(openssl rand 100 | xxd -p) Fans of "The Shining" might get a kick out of this: $ cycle 1 4 ' All work and no play makes Jack a dull boy.'

Sort the size usage of a directory tree by gigabytes, kilobytes, megabytes, then bytes.
Since coreutils 7.6 provides sort -h

Save a file you edited in vim without the needed permissions
Calls sudo tee like all the other lines, but also automatically reloads the file. Optionally you can add command Wq :execute ':W' | :q and command WQ :Wq to make quitting easier

copy working directory and compress it on-the-fly while showing progress
What happens here is we tell tar to create "-c" an archive of all files in current dir "." (recursively) and output the data to stdout "-f -". Next we specify the size "-s" to pv of all files in current dir. The "du -sb . | awk ?{print $1}?" returns number of bytes in current dir, and it gets fed as "-s" parameter to pv. Next we gzip the whole content and output the result to out.tgz file. This way "pv" knows how much data is still left to be processed and shows us that it will take yet another 4 mins 49 secs to finish. Credit: Peteris Krumins http://www.catonmat.net/blog/unix-utilities-pipe-viewer/

Read a keypress without echoing it
This shell snippet reads a single keypress from stdin and stores it in the $KEY variable. You do NOT have to press the enter key! The key is NOT echoed to stdout! This is useful for implementing simple text menus in scripts and similar things.


Stay in the loop…

Follow the Tweets.

Every new command is wrapped in a tweet and posted to Twitter. Following the stream is a great way of staying abreast of the latest commands. For the more discerning, there are Twitter accounts for commands that get a minimum of 3 and 10 votes - that way only the great commands get tweeted.

» http://twitter.com/commandlinefu
» http://twitter.com/commandlinefu3
» http://twitter.com/commandlinefu10

Subscribe to the feeds.

Use your favourite RSS aggregator to stay in touch with the latest commands. There are feeds mirroring the 3 Twitter streams as well as for virtually every other subset (users, tags, functions,…):

Subscribe to the feed for: