Commands by Habitual (3)

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swap the java version being used
You have openjdk and sun java installed. Many of your java plugins will not work properly. Something called IcedTea (the java web plugin) keeps crashing. Run this and select sun java to use sun java.

find all active IP addresses in a network

Transfer a file to multiple hosts over ssh
You can push files to up to 32 servers at once assuming ssh keys are in place. Great tool, it is part of the pssh suite.

gets all files committed to svn by a particular user since a particular date
just change the date following the -r flag, and/or the user name in the user== conditional statement, and substitute yms_web with the name of your module

Quickly graph a list of numbers
Useful when you've produced a large file of numbers, and want to quickly see the distribution. The value of y halfway along the x axis is the median. Simple! Just create the listOfNumbers.txt file with a number on each line to try it out.

Toggle between directories
switch to previous directory or toggle

Search for commands from the command line
Search at CommandLineFu.com from your terminal. Get the clfu-seach at http://www.colivre.coop.br/Aurium/CLFUSearch

Get the size of all the directories in current directory (Sorted Human Readable)
as per eightmillion's comment. Simply economical :)

while using lxde and being blinded by your laptop screen, you can type:
I'm not sure what apt this is, but it seems to work on most X screens, an is useful for saving power, and not straining your eyes

Display current bandwidth statistics
ifstat, part of ifstat package, is a tool for displaying bandwidth and other statistics. The -n option avoid to display header periodically, the -t option put a timestamp at the beginning of the line. Works for me on Debian and CentOS


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