Commands by HaoZeke (3)

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Word-based diff on reformatted text files
It can be hard to spot differences in reformatted files, because of all the diff noise created by word wrapped lines. This command removes all the noise and performs a word-by-word diff. To ignore empty lines, add -B to the diff command. Also, if this is something you do often, you might want to check out the wdiff(1) program.

Alternative size (human readable) of files and directories (biggest last)
using mb it's still readable;) a symbol variation $ du -ms {,.[^.]}* | sort -nk1

Tell local Debian machine to install packages used by remote Debian machine
(also works on Ubuntu) Copies the 'install,' 'hold,' 'deinstall' and 'purge' states of packages on the remote machine to be matched on the local machine. Note: if packages were installed on the local machine that were never installed on the remote machine, they will not be deinstalled by this operation.

Quickly CD Out Of Directories
`up 3` will climb the directory tree by three steps. `up asdf` will do nothing, and returns exit code 1 as an error should.

Watch the progress of 'dd'
Running this code will execute dd in the background, and you'll grab the process ID with '$!' and assign it to the 'pid' variable. Now, you can watch the progress with the following: $ while true; do kill -USR1 $pid && sleep 1 && clear; done The important thing to grasp here isn't the filename or location of your input or output, or even the block size for that matter, but the fact that you can keep an eye on 'dd' as it's running to see where you are at during its execution.

makes screen your default shell without breaking SCP or SFTP
I changed my shell to screen by editing .bashrc, this stopped scp from connecting. Adding two tests before screen fixed them problem.

Simplification of "sed 'your sed stuff here' file > file2 && mv file2 file"

gag version of current date

Rename files in batch

Find the package that installed a command


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