Commands by Honeypuck (1)

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Which processes are listening on a specific port (e.g. port 80)
swap out "80" for your port of interest. Can use port number or named ports e.g. "http"

Display laptop battery information

get the top 10 longest filenames

static noise effect (crt effect)

Create a random file of a specific size
This will create a 10 MB file named testfile.txt. Change the count parameter to change the size of the file. As one commenter pointed out, yes /dev/random can be used, but the content doesn't matter if you just need a file of a specific size for testing purposes, which is why I used /dev/zero. The file size is what matters, not the content. It's 10 MB either way. "Random" just referred to "any file - content not specific"

run php code inline from the command line
Most people know that you can run a PHP script from the command line like so: $php ./my_script.php But sometimes I just want to run a quick bit of code, the PHP Command Line Interface allows me to do so with the -r option. Requires package php5-cli

Count lines of code across multiple file types, sorted by least amount of code to greatest
Gives you a nice quick summary of how many lines each of your files is comprised of. (In this example, we just check .c, .h, .php and .pl). Since we just use wc -l to count, you'll just get a very rough estimate of how many lines of actual code there are. Use a more sophisticated algorithm instead if you need to.

search string in _all_ revisions

Sharing file through http 80 port
From the other machine open a web navigator and go to ip from the machine who launch netcat, http://ip-address/ If you have some web server listening at 80 port then you would need stop them or select another port before launch net cat ;-) * You need netcat tool installed

Automagically update grub.conf labels after installing a new kernel
I like to label my grub boot options with the correct kernel version/build. After building and installing a new kernel with "make install" I had to edit my grub.conf by hand. To avoid this, I've decided to write this little command line to: 1. read the version/build part of the filename to which the kernel symlinks point 2. replace the first label lines of grub.conf grub.conf label lines must be in this format: Latest [{name}-{version/build}] Old [{name}-{version/build}] only the {version/build} part is substituted. For instance: title Latest [GNU/Linux-2.6.31-gentoo-r10.201003] would turn to title Latest [GNU/Linux-2.6.32-gentoo-r7.201004]"


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