Commands by JohnGH (6)


  • 0
    cat file | paste -s -d'%' - | sed 's/\(^\|$\)/"/g;s/%/","/g'
    JohnGH · 2013-11-12 17:48:10 2
  • Awk magic to replace: cat /etc/sybase/interfaces | grep -A 1 -e "$SEARCH" | grep query | awk '{ print $4 }' | awk -F'.' '{print $2}'


    0
    awk '/^'$SEARCH'[ ]*$/{getline;if ($1 ~ /query/) {split($4,a,".");print a[2]}}' /etc/sybase/interfaces
    JohnGH · 2010-12-17 13:24:27 0
  • If you don't have nl on your system, this achieves a similar effect, the default behavior in nl is to not number blank lines, but this does.


    2
    grep -n "^" <filename>
    JohnGH · 2010-01-07 14:54:29 0
  • I needed to add a line to my crontab from within a script and didn't want to have to write my own temporary file. You may find you need to reload the crond after this to make the change take effect. e.g.: if [ -x /sbin/service ] then /sbin/service crond reload else CRON_PID=`ps -furoot | awk '/[^a-z]cron(d)?$/{print $2}'` if [ -n "$CRON_PID" ] then kill -HUP $CRON_PID fi fi The reason I had CRON_HOUR and CRON_MINS instead of numbers is that I wanted to generate a random time between midnight & 6AM to run the job, which I did with: CRON_HOUR=`/usr/bin/perl -e 'printf "%02d\n", int(rand(6))'` CRON_MINS=`/usr/bin/perl -e 'printf "%02d\n", int(rand(60));'`


    -1
    crontab -l | sed -e '$G;$s-$-'"$CRON_MINS $CRON_HOUR"' * * * /usr/bin/command >/dev/null 2>&1-' | crontab -
    JohnGH · 2010-01-07 11:00:05 0
  • print the lines of a file in randomized order Show Sample Output


    0
    perl -wl -e '@f=<>; for $i (0 .. $#f) { $r=int rand ($i+1); @f[$i, $r][email protected][$r,$i] if ($i!=$r); } chomp @f; print join $/, @f;' try.txt
    JohnGH · 2009-12-21 21:15:55 0
  • Once I wrote a command line calculator program in C, then I found this... and added to it a bit. For ease of use I normally use this in a tiny Perl program (which I call pc for 'Perl Calculator') #!/usr/bin/perl -w die "Usage: $0 MATHS\n" unless(@ARGV);for(@ARGV){s/x/*/g;s/v/sqrt /g;s/\^/**/g}; print eval(join('',@ARGV)),$/; It handles square roots, power, modulus: pc 1+2 (1 plus 2) 3 pc 3x4 (3 times 4) 12 pc 5^6 (5 to the power of 6) 15625 pc v 49 ( square root of 49 ) 7 pc 12/3 (12 divided by 3) 4 pc 19%4 (19 modulus 4) 3 (you can string maths together too) pc 10 x 10 x 10 1000 pc 10 + 10 + 10 / 2 25 pc 7 x v49 49 Show Sample Output


    2
    perl -e 'for(@ARGV){s/x/*/g;s/v/sqrt /g;s/\^/**/g};print eval(join("",@ARGV)),$/;'
    JohnGH · 2009-12-21 21:03:27 2

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Find all active ip's in a subnet

convert Decimal to IP from stdin
https://stackoverflow.com/questions/10768160/ip-address-converter


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