Commands by JustinHop (1)

  • Use the command watch, which is really hard to pass nested quotes to, and insert newlines where they are supposed to go in the HTTP request. that is after 1.1 after the host and two newlines at the end before the EOF. i use this all day what? no support for HEREDOCs on commandlinefu's interface? need more fu. Show Sample Output


    1
    watch -n 1 nc localhost 80 '<<EOF GET / HTTP/1.1 Host: tux-ninja Connection: Close EOF'
    JustinHop · 2009-08-06 23:20:31 0

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