Commands by KennethIWilliams (0)

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Display two calendar months side by side
Displays last month, current month, and next month side by side.

Shows space used by each directory of the root filesystem excluding mountpoints/external filesystems (and sort the output)
Excludes other mountpoints with acavagni's "mountpoint" idea, but with -exec instead of piping to an xargs subshell. Then, calling "du" only once with -exec's "+" option. The first "\! -exec" acts as a test so only those who match are passed to the second "-exec" for du.

back ssh from firewalled hosts
host B (you) redirects a modem port (62220) to his local ssh. host A is a remote machine (the ones that issues the ssh cmd). once connected port 5497 is in listening mode on host B. host B just do a ssh 127.0.0.1 -p 5497 -l user and reaches the remote host'ssh. This can be used also for vnc and so on.

Which processes are listening on a specific port (e.g. port 80)
swap out "80" for your port of interest. Can use port number or named ports e.g. "http"

list block devices
Shows all block devices in a tree with descruptions of what they are.

Convert seconds to [DD:][HH:]MM:SS
Converts any number of seconds into days, hours, minutes and seconds. sec2dhms() { declare -i SS="$1" D=$(( SS / 86400 )) H=$(( SS % 86400 / 3600 )) M=$(( SS % 3600 / 60 )) S=$(( SS % 60 )) [ "$D" -gt 0 ] && echo -n "${D}:" [ "$H" -gt 0 ] && printf "%02g:" "$H" printf "%02g:%02g\n" "$M" "$S" }

Switch to the previous branch used in git(1)
Very useful if you keep switching between the same two branches all the time.

Run a command, store the output in a pastebin on the internet and place the URL on the xclipboard
The URL can then be pasted with a middle click. This is probably useful when trying to explain problems over instant messaging when you don't have some sort of shared desktop.

Mac OS X: Change Color of the ls Command
I use terminal with black background on the Mac. Unfortunately, the default ls color for the directory is blue, which is very hard to see. By including the line above in my ~/.bash_profile file, I changed the directory's color to cyan, which is easer to see. For more information on the syntax of the LSCOLORS shell variable: $ man ls I tested this command on Mac OS X Leopard

Show the UUID of a filesystem or partition
Show the UUID-based alternate device names of ZEVO-related partitions on Darwin/OS X. Adapted from the lines by dbrady at http://zevo.getgreenbytes.com/forum/viewtopic.php?p=700#p700 and following the disk device naming scheme at http://zevo.getgreenbytes.com/wiki/pmwiki.php?n=Site.DiskDeviceNames


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