Commands by KoRoVaMiLK (9)

  • These are my favourite switches on pwgen: -B Don't include ambiguous characters in the password -n Include at least one number in the password -y Include at least one special symbol in the password -c Include at least one capital letter in the password It just works! Add a number to set password length, add another to set how many password to output. Example: pwgen -Bnyc 12 20 this will output 20 password of 12 chars length. Show Sample Output


    5
    pwgen -Bnyc
    KoRoVaMiLK · 2012-03-15 14:38:15 1
  • Used to verify if Network Time Protocol daemon is working properly. Show Sample Output


    4
    ntpq -p
    KoRoVaMiLK · 2010-09-14 07:39:20 0
  • Shows useful informations about file descriptors in Squid web proxy Show Sample Output


    -1
    squidclient mgr:info | grep "file desc"
    KoRoVaMiLK · 2010-07-29 17:35:20 0
  • On-the-fly conversion of Unix Time to human-readable in Squid's access.log Show Sample Output


    1
    perl -p -e 's/^([0-9]*)/"[".localtime($1)."]"/e' < /var/log/squid/access.log
    KoRoVaMiLK · 2010-06-22 08:42:40 0
  • Actually 'firefox' is a script that then launches the 'firefox-bin' executable. You need to specify the 'no-remote' option in order to launch remote firefox instead of your local one (this drove me crazy time ago)


    5
    ssh -fY user@REMOTESERVER firefox -no-remote
    KoRoVaMiLK · 2010-06-03 07:24:07 2
  • Useful since "export http_proxy=blahblah:8080" doesn't seem to work with pear Show Sample Output


    -1
    pear config-set http_proxy http://myusername:mypassword@corporateproxy:8080
    KoRoVaMiLK · 2010-05-13 14:44:03 0
  • Simple way to backup your LDAP entries: put this line on your crontab. The -n switch identifies the dbnum you want to backup (alternatively you can use -b suffix. Check man slapcat for your personal switches)


    1
    slapcat -n 1 > /backup/`date "+%Y%m%d"`.ldif
    KoRoVaMiLK · 2010-05-07 15:52:39 0
  • Prints current runlevel and system start time. On older systems it also shows the last init state. Pretty useful on remote systems, pretty useless on local ones :) Show Sample Output


    5
    who -r
    KoRoVaMiLK · 2010-05-05 12:58:09 1
  • This allows you to skip the banner (usually /etc/issue.net) on ssh connections. Useful to avoid banners outputted to your mail by rsync cronjobs.


    1
    ssh -q user@server
    KoRoVaMiLK · 2010-03-24 12:02:55 0

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Get the next weekday for an 'at' command
Line can be modified as needed. This considers weekdays to be Mon-Fri. If run any working day it'll provide a parameters for the next working day for "at". "beep" provided as a sample command. This can be modified easily to include wait time. If you need something to run "D" days after today: # D=4;if [ $(date +%u --date="${D} days") -lt 5 ];then AT="+${D} days";else AT="next monday";fi; echo "beep" | at noon ${AT}

sed /pat/!d without using sed (no RE; limited to shell patterns aka globbing)
POSIX requires this "string truncating" functionality. might as well use it, at least for very small tasks where invoking sed and using RE is overkill.

find and grep Word docs
Find Word docs by filename in the current directory, convert each of them to plain text using antiword (taking care of spaces in filenames), then grep for a search term in the particular file. (Of course, it's better to save your data as plain text to make for easier grepping, but that's not always possible.) Requires antiword. Or you can modify it to use catdoc instead.

list block devices
Shows all block devices in a tree with descruptions of what they are.

Convert seconds to [DD:][HH:]MM:SS
Converts any number of seconds into days, hours, minutes and seconds. sec2dhms() { declare -i SS="$1" D=$(( SS / 86400 )) H=$(( SS % 86400 / 3600 )) M=$(( SS % 3600 / 60 )) S=$(( SS % 60 )) [ "$D" -gt 0 ] && echo -n "${D}:" [ "$H" -gt 0 ] && printf "%02g:" "$H" printf "%02g:%02g\n" "$M" "$S" }

return external ip

Do some learning...
I like it sorted... 2> /dev/null was also needless, since our pipes already select stdin, only.

list block devices
Shows all block devices in a tree with descruptions of what they are.

Find the package that installed a command

Create an animated gif from a Youtube video
requires "youtube-dl" -- sure you can do this with wget and some more obscurity but why waste your time when this great tool is available? the guts consist of mplayer converting a video to a gif -- study this command and read the man page for more information $ mplayer video.flv -ss 00:23 -endpos 6 -vo gif89a:fps=5:output=output.gif -vf scale=400:300 -nosound generates a 6 second gif starting at 23 seconds of play time at 5 fps and a scale of 400x300 start time (-ss)/end time (-endpos) formats: 00:00:00.000 end time should be relative to start time, not absolute. i.e. -endpos 5 == seconds after 0:42 = 0:47 end point play with fps and scale for lower gif sizes the subshell is a solution for the -b flag on youtube-dl which downloads the best quality video, sometimes, which can be various video formats $(ls ${url##*=}*| tail -n1)


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