Commands by KurtisPowlowski (0)

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ping a range of IP addresses
nmap accepts a wide variety of addressing notation, multiple targets/ranges, etc.

Most simple way to get a list of open ports

Kill all processes that listen to ports begin with 50 (50, 50x, 50xxx,...)
Run netstat as root (via sudo) to get the ID of the process listening on the desired socket. Use awk to 1) match the entry that is the listening socket, 2) matching the exact port (bounded by leading colon and end of column), 3) remove the trailing slash and process name from the last column, and finally 4) use the system(…) command to call kill to terminate the process. Two direct commands, netstat & awk, and one forked call to kill. This does kill the specific port instead of any port that starts with 50. I consider this to be safer.

erase content from a cdrw

Make vim open in tabs by default (save to .profile)
I always add this to my .profile rc so I can do things like: "vim *.c" and the files are opened in tabs.

Install pip with Proxy
Installs pip packages defining a proxy

Loop over the days of a month, in $YYYY$MM$DD format
Edit YYYY and MM at the beginning of the command with the year and month you want. Note that `DD=$(printf "%02d" $d)` will pad single digit integers with a leading zero. Substitute `echo $YYYY$MM$DD` at the end of the line with the command you want to launch, for instance script.pl --yyyymmdd $YYYY$MM$DD Also available on GitHub as bash util: https://github.com/fibo/yyyymmdd

check open ports without netstat or lsof

Open a Remote Desktop (RDP) session with a custom resolution.
Using a widescreen monitor, I often get annoyed that the RDP window is too high, or too narrow for what I want to display. In this example, I'm on a 1680 x 1050 display.

Undo several commits by committing an inverse patch.
Use this to make a new commit that "softly" reverts a branch to some commit (i.e. squashes the history into an inverse patch). You can review the changes first by doing the diff alone.


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