Commands by Lewix (1)

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What is my public IP-address?
Very effective, use only DNS protocol. The @ part is optional if you already set opendns servers as default ns servers.

Eavesdrop on your system
This command takes a snapshot of the open files for a PID 1234 then waits 10 seconds and takes another snapshot of the same PID, it then displays the difference between each snapshot to give you an insight into what the application is doing.

Generate Random Passwords
If you want a password length longer than 6, changing the -c6 to read -c8 will give you 8 random characters instead of 6. To end up with a line-feed, use this with echo: # echo `< /dev/urandom tr -dc _A-Z-a-z-0-9 | head -c6`

remove oprhan package on debian based system

Get AWS temporary credentials ready to export based on a MFA virtual appliance
You might want to secure your AWS operations requiring to use a MFA token. But then to use API or tools, you need to pass credentials generated with a MFA token. This commands asks you for the MFA code and retrieves these credentials using AWS Cli. To print the exports, you can use: `awk '{ print "export AWS_ACCESS_KEY_ID=\"" $1 "\"\n" "export AWS_SECRET_ACCESS_KEY=\"" $2 "\"\n" "export AWS_SESSION_TOKEN=\"" $3 "\"" }'` You must adapt the command line to include: * $MFA_IDis ARN of the virtual MFA or serial number of the physical one * TTL for the credentials

Auto Get Missing Launchpad Keys
You can choose these mirror servers to get gpg keys, if the official one ever goes offline keyserver.ubuntu.com pool.sks-keyservers.net subkeys.pgp.net pgp.mit.edu keys.nayr.net keys.gnupg.net wwwkeys.en.pgp.net #(replace with your country code fr, en, de,etc)

find and delete empty dirs, start in current working dir

Convert seconds to [DD:][HH:]MM:SS
Converts any number of seconds into days, hours, minutes and seconds. sec2dhms() { declare -i SS="$1" D=$(( SS / 86400 )) H=$(( SS % 86400 / 3600 )) M=$(( SS % 3600 / 60 )) S=$(( SS % 60 )) [ "$D" -gt 0 ] && echo -n "${D}:" [ "$H" -gt 0 ] && printf "%02g:" "$H" printf "%02g:%02g\n" "$M" "$S" }

Quick access to the ascii table.

Start dd and show progress every X seconds
Adjust "sleep X" to your needs. *NOTE: First sleep is required because bash doesn't have a "post-test" syntax (do XXX while).


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