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Find longest running non-root processes on a machine
If you have ever been trying to look for a list of processes based on their elapsed time you don't need to look any further. This command lets you find the list of processes ordered in a reversed order (oldest at the top) that have been running for over an hour on your system. Any system processes are filtered out, leaving only user initiated ones in. I find it extremely useful for debugging and performance analysis.

Find usb device in realtime
Using this command you can track a moment when usb device was attached.

move contents of the current directory to the parent directory, then remove current directory.
I think this is less resource consuming than the previous examples

Limit the transfer rate of a pipe with pv
-L RATE, --rate-limit RATE Limit the transfer to a maximum of RATE bytes per second. A suffix of "k", "m", "g", or "t" can be added to denote kilobytes (*1024), megabytes, and so on. It must be an integer.

Find files of two different extensions and copy them to a directory

Check your unread Gmail from the command line
Checks the Gmail ATOM feed for your account, parses it and outputs a list of unread messages. For some reason sed gets stuck on OS X, so here's a Perl version for the Mac: $ curl -u username:password --silent "https://mail.google.com/mail/feed/atom" | tr -d '\n' | awk -F '' '{for (i=2; i

find files in a date range
Find files in a specific date range - in this case, the first half of last year. -newermt = modification time of the file is more recent than this date GNU find allows any date specfication that GNU date would accept, e.g. $ find . -type f -newermt "3 years ago" ! -newermt "2 years ago" or $ find . -type f -newermt "last monday"

Spoof your wireless MAC address on OS X to 00:e2:e3:e4:e5:e6
If you want to check that the spoof worked, type the same command as earlier: $ifconfig en1 | grep ether Now you will see: $ether 00:e2:e3:e4:e5:e6 For the wired ethernet port: $sudo ifconfig en0 ether 00:e2:e3:e4:e5:e6

Install pip with Proxy
Installs pip packages defining a proxy

make a log of a terminal session
Creates a log of a session in a file called typescript. Or specify the file with: $script filename Exit the session with control-d.


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