Commands by MagisterQuis (4)

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convert filenames in current directory to lowercase
This will convert filenames from uppercase to lowercase. I find this useful after downloading images from my digital camera. This works for English, but other languages may need something slightly more complex like this: $ for i in *; do mv "$i" "$(echo $i|tr [:upper:] [:lower:])"; done Also, the quote marks aren't necessary if your filenames don't contain spaces.

Which processes are listening on a specific port (e.g. port 80)
swap out "80" for your port of interest. Can use port number or named ports e.g. "http"

list processes with established tcp connections (without netstat)
Uses lsof to list open network connections (file descriptors), grepping for only those in an established state

underscore to camelCase

Zip each file in a directory individually with the original file name
This will list the files in a directory, then zip each one with the original filename individually. video1.wmv -> video1.zip video2.wmv -> video2.zip This was for zipping up large amounts of video files for upload on a Windows machine.

Find usb device
I often use it to find recently added ou removed device, or using find in /dev, or anything similar. Just run the command, plug the device, and wait to see him and only him

Validating a file with checksum
Makes sure the contents of "myfile" are the same contents that the author intended given the author's md5 hash of that file ("c84fa6b830e38ee8a551df61172d53d7").

Remove all but one specific file

Which processes are listening on a specific port (e.g. port 80)
swap out "80" for your port of interest. Can use port number or named ports e.g. "http"

find an unused unprivileged TCP port
Some commands (such as netcat) have a port option but how can you know which ports are unused?


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