Commands by MaryCPolanco (0)

  • bash: commands not found

What's this?

commandlinefu.com is the place to record those command-line gems that you return to again and again. That way others can gain from your CLI wisdom and you from theirs too. All commands can be commented on, discussed and voted up or down.

Share Your Commands


Check These Out

Generate a random password 30 characters long

to see about php configure
see about php install configure

Copy a file from a remote server to your local box using on-the-fly compression
-P displays a progress meter -z tells rsync to use compression

Find usb device in realtime
Using this command you can track a moment when usb device was attached.

do a full file listing of every file found with locate

copy last command to clipboard
Copy the last command to clipboard (os x)

Find usb device in realtime
Using this command you can track a moment when usb device was attached.

Merge AVI-files without recoding
Useful for when you download movies split into < 700mb parts. Credit to rich @ http://superuser.com/questions/318640/merge-avi-files-without-recoding-in-mac-os-x-lion mencoder is generally included with mplayer. MacPorts: $sudo port install mplayer

Backticks are evil
This is a simple example of using proper command nesting using $() over ``. There are a number of advantages of $() over backticks. First, they can be easily nested without escapes: $ program1 $(program2 $(program3 $(program4))) versus $ program1 `program2 \`program3 \`program4\`\`` Second, they're easier to read, then trying to decipher the difference between the backtick and the singlequote: `'. The only drawback $() suffers from is lack of total portability. If your script must be portable to the archaic Bourne shell, or old versions of the C-shell or Korn shell, then backticks are appropriate, otherwise, we should all get into the habit of $(). Your future script maintainers will thank you for producing cleaner code.

Extract tarball from internet without local saving


Stay in the loop…

Follow the Tweets.

Every new command is wrapped in a tweet and posted to Twitter. Following the stream is a great way of staying abreast of the latest commands. For the more discerning, there are Twitter accounts for commands that get a minimum of 3 and 10 votes - that way only the great commands get tweeted.

» http://twitter.com/commandlinefu
» http://twitter.com/commandlinefu3
» http://twitter.com/commandlinefu10

Subscribe to the feeds.

Use your favourite RSS aggregator to stay in touch with the latest commands. There are feeds mirroring the 3 Twitter streams as well as for virtually every other subset (users, tags, functions,…):

Subscribe to the feed for: