Commands by Mikelifeguard (3)

  • This normalizes volume in your mp3 library, but uses mp3gain's "album" mode. This applies a gain change to all files from each directory (which are presumed to be from the same album) - so their volume relative to one another is changed, while the average album volume is normalized. This is done because if one track from an album is quieter or louder than the others, it was probably meant to be that way.


    2
    find . -type f -name '*.mp3' -execdir mp3gain -a '{}' +
    Mikelifeguard · 2010-03-21 22:23:44 0
  • Execute this in the root of your music library and this recurses through the directories and normalizes each folder containing mp3s as a batch. This assumes those folders hold an album each. The command "normalize-audio" may go by "normalize" on some systems.


    -2
    find . -type d -exec sh -c "normalize-audio -b \"{}\"/*.mp3" \;
    Mikelifeguard · 2009-12-08 03:13:13 1
  • Get your server's fingerprints to give to users to verify when they ssh in. Publickey locations may vary by distro. Fingerprints should be provided out-of-band. Show Sample Output


    4
    ssh-keygen -l -f /etc/ssh/ssh_host_rsa_key.pub && ssh-keygen -l -f /etc/ssh/ssh_host_dsa_key.pub
    Mikelifeguard · 2009-10-26 17:52:41 0

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