Commands by Miles (1)

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Get the next weekday for an 'at' command
Line can be modified as needed. This considers weekdays to be Mon-Fri. If run any working day it'll provide a parameters for the next working day for "at". "beep" provided as a sample command. This can be modified easily to include wait time. If you need something to run "D" days after today: # D=4;if [ $(date +%u --date="${D} days") -lt 5 ];then AT="+${D} days";else AT="next monday";fi; echo "beep" | at noon ${AT}

Convert seconds to [DD:][HH:]MM:SS
Converts any number of seconds into days, hours, minutes and seconds. sec2dhms() { declare -i SS="$1" D=$(( SS / 86400 )) H=$(( SS % 86400 / 3600 )) M=$(( SS % 3600 / 60 )) S=$(( SS % 60 )) [ "$D" -gt 0 ] && echo -n "${D}:" [ "$H" -gt 0 ] && printf "%02g:" "$H" printf "%02g:%02g\n" "$M" "$S" }

Prints new content of files
Useful to e.g. keep an eye on several logfiles.

Countdown Clock
The biggest advantage over atoponce's nifty original is not killing the scrollback. Written assuming bash, but shouldn't be terribly difficult to port to other shells. S should be multiple spaces, but I can't get commandlinefu to save/show them properly, any help?

Convert seconds to [DD:][HH:]MM:SS
Converts any number of seconds into days, hours, minutes and seconds. sec2dhms() { declare -i SS="$1" D=$(( SS / 86400 )) H=$(( SS % 86400 / 3600 )) M=$(( SS % 3600 / 60 )) S=$(( SS % 60 )) [ "$D" -gt 0 ] && echo -n "${D}:" [ "$H" -gt 0 ] && printf "%02g:" "$H" printf "%02g:%02g\n" "$M" "$S" }

Two command output
Summarize established connections after netstat output. Using tee and /dev/stderr you can send one command output to terminal before executing wc so you can summarize at the bottom of the output.

Get AWS temporary credentials ready to export based on a MFA virtual appliance
You might want to secure your AWS operations requiring to use a MFA token. But then to use API or tools, you need to pass credentials generated with a MFA token. This commands asks you for the MFA code and retrieves these credentials using AWS Cli. To print the exports, you can use: `awk '{ print "export AWS_ACCESS_KEY_ID=\"" $1 "\"\n" "export AWS_SECRET_ACCESS_KEY=\"" $2 "\"\n" "export AWS_SESSION_TOKEN=\"" $3 "\"" }'` You must adapt the command line to include: * $MFA_IDis ARN of the virtual MFA or serial number of the physical one * TTL for the credentials

Show simple disk IO table using snmp
Show a simple table with disk IO for the specified host. you monitor a LOT of different thing. Mostly used for MRTG and similar, but this is nice for a quick look, which disk is busy. "public" is your SNMP community ensure that snmpd is running on the host which you intend to monitor

Merge bash terminal histories

Remove all zero size files from current directory (not recursive)
works only in zsh


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