Commands by NPH (1)

What's this?

commandlinefu.com is the place to record those command-line gems that you return to again and again. That way others can gain from your CLI wisdom and you from theirs too. All commands can be commented on, discussed and voted up or down.

Share Your Commands


Check These Out

Which processes are listening on a specific port (e.g. port 80)
swap out "80" for your port of interest. Can use port number or named ports e.g. "http"

Determine whether a CPU has 64 bit capability or not

View the latest astronomy picture of the day from NASA.
Substitute feh for the image viewer of your choice. display (part of imagemagick) seems to be a popular choice.

Create a persistent remote Proxy server through an SSH channel
Create a persistent remote Proxy server through an SSH channel.

mount a cdrom

search for files or directories, then show a sorted list of just the unique directories where the matches occur
Ever use 'locate' to find a common phrase in a filename or directory name? Often you'll get a huge list of matches, many of which are redundant, and typically the results are not sorted. This command will 'locate' your search phrase, then show you a sorted list of just the relevant directories, with no duplications. So, for example, maybe you have installed several versions of the java jre and you want to track down every directory where files matching "java" might exist. Well, a 'locate java' is likely to return a huge list with many repeated directories since many files in one directory could contain the phrase "java". This command will whittle down the results to a minimal list of unique directory names where your search phrase finds a match.

Most used command

show the date every rpm was installed
the newest rpms are at the top; individual packages can also be queried this way: rpm --last -q package

list block devices
Shows all block devices in a tree with descruptions of what they are.

Watch active calls on an Asterisk PBX
Only the number of calls nothing else.


Stay in the loop…

Follow the Tweets.

Every new command is wrapped in a tweet and posted to Twitter. Following the stream is a great way of staying abreast of the latest commands. For the more discerning, there are Twitter accounts for commands that get a minimum of 3 and 10 votes - that way only the great commands get tweeted.

» http://twitter.com/commandlinefu
» http://twitter.com/commandlinefu3
» http://twitter.com/commandlinefu10

Subscribe to the feeds.

Use your favourite RSS aggregator to stay in touch with the latest commands. There are feeds mirroring the 3 Twitter streams as well as for virtually every other subset (users, tags, functions,…):

Subscribe to the feed for: