Commands by NoahY (1)

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Remove lines that contain a specific pattern($1) from file($2).
The -i option in sed allows in-place editing of the input file. Replace myexpression with any regular expression. /expr/d syntax means if the expression matches then delete the line. You can reverse the functionality to keep matching lines only by using: $ sed -i -n '/myexpression/p' /path/to/file.txt

Function to change prompt
Bash function to change your default prompt to something simpler and restore it to normal afterwards.

Fix subtitle timing (for .sub files)
Fix a microdvd (.sub) subtitle timing by making the phrases to appear 600 frames earlier.

get xclip to own the clipboard contents
"Copying" things to the X clipboard doesn't normally create a copy. Rather the data to be 'copied' is referenced. This means that if the application that you 'copied' stuff from is closed, that data is lost. If the application that you 'copied' from is suspended with CTRL-Z, there could be some issues if you try to paste it into something. This command will create a copy of referenced data and have xclip be the provider of it, so you can then go ahead and close the app that contains the original information. Caveat: I'm not sure if this is binary-safe (though i would expect it to be), and don't know what would happen if you used it to clip a 20 meg gimp image. This technique becomes more convenient if you set it up as an action in a clipboard manager (eg klipper, parcellite). Some of these applets can take automatic action based on a variety of parameters, so you could probably just get it to always own the clipped data whenever data is clipped.

Do a command but skip recording it in the bash command history
Note the extra space before the command (I had to put it as an underscore since the website eats up preceding spaces). That's all it takes. Now if you check your history with "$ history", it wont show up.

du command without showing other mounted file systems

Run a long job and notify me when it's finished
You will need libnotify-bin for this to work: $ sudo aptitude install libnotify-bin

Do the last command, but say 'y' to everything
I doubt this works with other than bash, but then again, I havent tried. The 'yes' utility is very simple, it outputs a hell of a lot of 'y's to standard input. The '!!' command means 'the last command'. So this one-lines inputs a lot of y's into the last command, aggressively agreeing to everything. For instance, when doing apt-get.

Running a command at a specific time

Have your sound card call out elapsed time.
Useful contexts : You are doing yoga or some other physical training in which you are holding a position. Or you practice the pomodoro productivity technique. Or your girlfriend said "We're leaving in 40 minutes". Design details: sleep executes before espeak to give you a 5 seconds head start. espeak is run in the background so it doesn't mess up the timing.


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