Commands by OS2 (1)

  • used in an if-then-else in case the default shell is ksh, not bash. The $(basename ${0#-}) is handy to echo which shell and strip the dash some flavors put in front of "bash" if [ $(basename ${0#-}) == "bash" ] ; then export PS1='\[\e]0;\h \u \w\a\]\n\[\e[0;34m\]\u@\h \[\e[33m\]\w\[\e[0;32m\]\n\$ ' else HOST=`hostname` ESC=`echo "\033"` BEL=`echo "\007"` RAW=`echo "\r"` export PS1='-${RAW}${ESC}]0;${HOST} ${USER}${BEL}-${ESC}[0;34m${USER}${ESC}[0m@${ESC}[0;34m${HOST%%.*}${ESC}[0;33m${ESC}[0m $ ' fi Show Sample Output


    1
    export PS1='\[\e]0;\h \u \w\a\]\n\[\e[0;34m\]\u@\h \[\e[33m\]\w\[\e[0;32m\]\n\$ '
    OS2 · 2009-02-13 19:49:17 0

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Print text string vertically, one character per line.

Convert seconds to [DD:][HH:]MM:SS
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Close specify detached screen
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"at" command w/o the resource usage/competition issues
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