Commands by Ovidiu (1)

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Get last sleep time on a Mac
Similarly for last wake time: $ sysctl -a | grep waketime

rename anime fansubs
renames Anime Episodes to files, that can be parsed by sonarr & co

Detect illegal access to kernel space, potentially useful for Meltdown detection
Based on capsule8 agent examples, not rigorously tested

Save an HTML page, and covert it to a .pdf file
Uses htmldoc to perform the conversion

check open ports without netstat or lsof

Verbosely delete files matching specific name pattern, older than 15 days.

Which processes are listening on a specific port (e.g. port 80)
swap out "80" for your port of interest. Can use port number or named ports e.g. "http"

Brute force discover
Show the number of failed tries of login per account. If the user does not exist it is marked with *.

list block devices
Shows all block devices in a tree with descruptions of what they are.

Print every Nth line
Sometimes commands give you too much feedback. Perhaps 1/100th might be enough. If so, every() is for you. $ my_verbose_command | every 100 will print every 100th line of output. Specifically, it will print lines 100, 200, 300, etc If you use a negative argument it will print the *first* of a block, $ my_verbose_command | every -100 It will print lines 1, 101, 201, 301, etc The function wraps up this useful sed snippet: $ ... | sed -n '0~100p' don't print anything by default $ sed -n starting at line 0, then every hundred lines ( ~100 ) print. $ '0~100p' There's also some bash magic to test if the number is negative: we want character 0, length 1, of variable N. $ ${N:0:1} If it *is* negative, strip off the first character ${N:1} is character 1 onwards (second actual character).


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