Commands by R0b0t1 (1)

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check open ports without netstat or lsof

Get your Firefox bookmarks
Extracts yours bookmarks out of sqlite with the format: dateAdded|url

Get own public IP address
Returns your external IP address to the command line using only wget

Rename files in batch

Convert CSV to JSON
Replace 'csv_file.csv' with your filename.

Show URL/text in clipboard as QR code
Copy a URL (or Thai text, or whatever) and hit the keyboard shortcut for this fu to display it as a QR code. It's an "air gapped" way to send stuff to your phone [unlike google chart API etc.] as long as you watch out for cameras ;). dependencies [sudo apt-get install]: qrencode xclip xloadimage

Perform a branching conditional
This will perform one of two blocks of code, depending on the condition of the first. Essentially is a bash terniary operator. To tell if a machine is up: $ ping -c1 machine { echo succes;} || { echo failed; } Because of the bash { } block operators, you can have multiple commands $ ping -c1 machine && { echo success;log-timestamp.sh }|| { echo failed; email-admin.sh; } Tips: Remember, the { } operators are treated by bash as a reserved word: as such, they need a space on either side. If you have a command that can fail at the end of the true block, consider ending said block with 'false' to prevent accidental execution

A DESTRUCTIVE command to render a drive unbootable
Overwrites the boot sector. Since this doesn't overwrite any data, you can usually recover by re-creating the partition table exactly the same as before you zeroed it. This can also help sometimes if you install a new drive in a Windows machine which can't read it.

Print every Nth line
Sometimes commands give you too much feedback. Perhaps 1/100th might be enough. If so, every() is for you. $ my_verbose_command | every 100 will print every 100th line of output. Specifically, it will print lines 100, 200, 300, etc If you use a negative argument it will print the *first* of a block, $ my_verbose_command | every -100 It will print lines 1, 101, 201, 301, etc The function wraps up this useful sed snippet: $ ... | sed -n '0~100p' don't print anything by default $ sed -n starting at line 0, then every hundred lines ( ~100 ) print. $ '0~100p' There's also some bash magic to test if the number is negative: we want character 0, length 1, of variable N. $ ${N:0:1} If it *is* negative, strip off the first character ${N:1} is character 1 onwards (second actual character).

Start dd and show progress every X seconds


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