Commands by RiskNerd (3)

  • Recursively compares files in directories DIR and OLD_FILES using dwdiff Word-by-word comparison with dwdiff results in words unique to NEW file versions in the DIR directory tree shown enclosed in [- SQUARE BRACKETS -] and words unique to OLD file versions in the OLD_FILES directory tree shown enclosed in {+ CURLY BRACES +} Note: does not detect files unique to the OLD_FILES directory tree. Show Sample Output


    0
    find DIR -exec sh -c "if [ -f \"{}\" ]; then echo {} >> dwdiff.txt; dwdiff --no-common {} /OLD_FILES/{} >> dwdiff.txt; echo \"--EOF--\" >> dwdiff.txt; fi" \;
    RiskNerd · 2022-02-23 08:52:13 182
  • Use this function with bash version 4+ to convert arbitrary hexadecimal sequences to binary. If you don't have bash 4+ then modify the lowercase to uppercase demangling statement s=${@^^} to set s equal to the uppercase hex input or the bc command throws an input parser error. Show Sample Output


    0
    hex2bin () { s=${@^^}; for i in $(seq 0 1 $((${#s}-1))); do printf "%04s" `printf "ibase=16; obase=2; ${s:$i:1};\n" | bc` ; done; printf "\n"; }
    RiskNerd · 2018-10-02 22:02:33 19
  • Compare the content of the files in the current directory with files of the same name in the duplicate directory. Pop Quiz: You have a duplicate of a directory with files of the same name that might differ. What do you do? You could use diff to compare the directories, but that's boring and it isn't as clever as find -print0 with xargs. Note: You must omit stderr redirect 2>/dev/null to see the list of missing files from DUPDIR, if any. Hint: Redirect stderr to a new file to produce a more readable list of files that are missing from DUPDIR. Warning: This doesn't tell you if DUPDIR contains files not found in the current directory so don't delete DUPDIR. Show Sample Output


    0
    find . -maxdepth 1 -mindepth 1 -print0 | xargs -0 -n 1 -I % cmp % /DUPDIR/% 2>/dev/null
    RiskNerd · 2018-07-08 02:25:57 23

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