Commands by SamuelWN (1)

  • The function had to be cut down to meet the maximum command length requirements. The full version of the function is: extract() { if [ -f $1 ]; then case $1 in *.tar.bz2) tar xvjf $1 ;; *.tar.gz) tar xvzf $1 ;; *.bz2) bunzip2 $1 ;; *.rar) unrar x $1 ;; *.gz) gunzip $1 ;; *.tar) tar xvf $1 ;; *.tbz2) tar xvjf $1 ;; *.tgz) tar xvzf $1 ;; *.zip) unzip $1 ;; *.Z) uncompress $1 ;; *.7z) 7z x $1 ;; *) echo "'$1' cannot be extracted via >extract<" ;; esac else echo "'$1' is not a valid file!" fi } Note: This is not my original code. I came across it in a forum somewhere a while ago, and it's been such a useful addition to my .bashrc file, that I thought it worth sharing. Show Sample Output


    0
    extract() {if [ -f $1 ];then case $1 in *.tar.bz2) tar xvjf $1;;*.tar.gz) tar xvzf $1;;*.bz2) bunzip2 $1;;*.rar) unrar x $1;;*.gz) gunzip $1;;*.tar) tar xvf $1;;*.tbz2) tar xvjf $1;;*.tgz) tar xvzf $1;;*.zip) unzip $1;;*.7z) 7z x $1;;esac fi}
    SamuelWN · 2016-02-08 14:52:05 0

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