Commands by SeanDeNigris (0)

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Monitor RX/TX packets and any subsquent errors
www.fir3net.com

Convert CSV to JSON
Replace 'csv_file.csv' with your filename.

Squish repeated delimiters into one
This can be particularly useful used in conjunction with a following cut command like $echo "hello::::there" | tr -s ':' | cut -d':' -f2 which prints 'there'. Much easier that guessing at -f values for cut. I know 'tr -s' is used in lots of commands here already but I just figured out the -s flag and thought it deserved to be highlighted :)

List open sockets protocol/address/port/state/PID/program name

list block devices
Shows all block devices in a tree with descruptions of what they are.

Move all comments the top of the file in vim
Python comments begin with a #. Modify to suit other languages. Other uses: Instead of m0 use m$ for end of file or d for deleting all comments.

Huh? Where did all my precious space go ?
Sort ls output of all files in current directory in ascending order Just the 20 biggest ones: $ ls -la | sort -k 5bn | tail -n 20 A variant for the current directory tree with subdirectories and pretty columns is: $ find . -type f -print0 | xargs -0 ls -la | sort -k 5bn | column -t And finding the subdirectories consuming the most space with displayed block size 1k: $ du -sk ./* | sort -k 1bn | column -t

Show whats going on restoring files from a spectrum protect backup
spectrum protect's dsmc command shows file names and total amount of restore. This command shows which files are actually open and their siz in GB and highlights the change to the previous output

Convert seconds to [DD:][HH:]MM:SS
Converts any number of seconds into days, hours, minutes and seconds. sec2dhms() { declare -i SS="$1" D=$(( SS / 86400 )) H=$(( SS % 86400 / 3600 )) M=$(( SS % 3600 / 60 )) S=$(( SS % 60 )) [ "$D" -gt 0 ] && echo -n "${D}:" [ "$H" -gt 0 ] && printf "%02g:" "$H" printf "%02g:%02g\n" "$M" "$S" }

Rename duplicates from MusicBrainz Picard
Renames duplicates from MusicBrainz Picard, so you get the latest copy and not a bunch of duplicates.


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