Commands by Shango1980 (1)

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format txt as table not joining empty columns
-n switch keeps empty columns If your distribution does not ship with a recent column version that supports -n you can use this alternative: perl -pe 's/(^|;);/$1 ;/g' file.csv | column -ts\; | less -S Change the delimiter to your liking.

for ssh uptime
This will run them at the same time and timeout for each host in ten seconds. Also, mussh will append the ip addres to the beginning of the output so you know which host resonded with which time. The use of the sequence expression {1..50} is not specific to mussh. The `seq ...` works, but is less efficient.

Copy history from one terminal to another
Or just do history -w before opening another terminal.

Rename files in batch

List all authors of a particular git project
List everyone who committed to a particular project, listed alphabetically. To list by commits, add -n to the shortlog.

Advanced ls using find to show much more detail than ls ever could
This alias is super-handy for me because it quickly shows the details of each file in the current directory. The output is nice because it is sortable, allowing you to expand this basic example to do something amazing like showing you a list of the newest files, the largest files, files with bad perms, etc.. A recursive alias would be: $ alias LSR='find -mount -printf "%.5m %10M %#9u:%-9g %#5U:%-5G %TF_%TR %CF_%CR %AF_%AR %#15s [%Y] %p\n" 2>/dev/null' From: http://www.askapache.com/linux/bash_profile-functions-advanced-shell.html

Generat a Random MAC address

Set blanket packet/second limit on network interface for Ubuntu VPS server
VPS server hosts suspect DOS attack if PPS is too high. This limits packets at the interface level. Do "sudo apt-get install iptables-persistent" to make persistent, or, if you already have, reconfigure with "sudo dpkg-reconfigure iptables-persistent"

Adjust gamma so monitor doesn't mess up your body's clock
[UPDATE: Now works for multiple connected outputs] I woke up around midnight with an urge to do some late night hacking, but I didn't want a bright monitor screwing up my body's circadian rhythm. I've heard that at night blue (short wavelength) lights are particularly bad for your diurnal clock. That may be a bunch of hooey, but it is true that redder (longer wavelength) colors are easier on my eyes at night. This command makes the screen dimmer and adjusts the gamma curves to improve contrast, particularly darkening blues and greens (Rɣ=2, Gɣ=3, Bɣ=4). To reset your screen to normal, you can run this command: $ xrandr | sed -n 's/ connected.*//p' | xargs -n1 -tri xrandr --output {} --brightness 1 --gamma 1:1:1 or, more briefly, $ xgamma -g 1 Note: The sed part is fragile and wrong. I'm doing it this way because of a misfeature in xrandr(1), which requires an output be specified but has no programmatic way of querying available outputs. Someone needs to patch up xrandr to be shell script friendly or at least add virtual outputs named "PRIMARY" and "ALL". . Todo: Screen should dim (gradually) at sunset and brighten at sunrise. I think this could be done with a self-resubmitting at job, but I'm running into the commandlinefu 127 character limit just getting the sunrise time: $ wget http://aa.usno.navy.mil/cgi-bin/aa_pap.pl --post-data=$(date "+xxy=%Y&xxm=%m&xxd=%d")"&st=WA&place=Seattle" -q -O- | sed -rn 's/\W*Sunrise\W*(.*)/\1/p' I hope some clever hacker comes up with a command line interface to Google's "OneBox", since the correct time shows up as the first hit when googling for "sunrise:cityname". . [Thank you to @flatcap for the sed improvement, which is much better than the head|tail|cut silliness I had before. And thank you to @braunmagrin for pointing out that the "connected" output may not be on the second line.]

list block devices
Shows all block devices in a tree with descruptions of what they are.


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