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Tracklist reaplace backspace to '-'
Requires perl 5.14 or greater

[re]verify a disc with very friendly output
[re]verify those burned CD's early and often - better safe than sorry - at a bare minimum you need the good old `dd` and `md5sum` commands, but why not throw in a super "user-friendly" progress gauge with the `pv` command - adjust the ``-s'' "size" argument to your needs - 700 MB in this case, and capture that checksum in a "test.md5" file with `tee` - just in-case for near-future reference. *uber-bonus* ability - positively identify those unlabeled mystery discs - for extra credit, what disc was used for this sample output?

Print one . instead of each line
If you're running a command with a lot of output, this serves as a simple progress indicator. This avoids the need to use `/dev/null` for silencing. It works for any command that outputs lines, updates live (`fflush` avoids buffering), and is simple to understand.

Check if a web page has changed last time checked.
Checks if a web page has changed. Put it into cron to check periodically. Change http://www.page.de/test.html and mail@mail.de for your needs.

Getting information about model no. of computer
This command gives a model information of a computer. Also useful in determining the host is a VM machine or actual physical machine.

List all Samba user name

Fire CMD every time FILE (or directory) is updated (on *BSD)

display emerge.log date in a human friendly way
gentoo only or gentoo-like linux distributions.

Copy stdin to your X11 buffer
Have you ever had to scp a file to your work machine in order to copy its contents to a mail? xclip can help you with that. It copies its stdin to the X11 buffer, so all you have to do is middle-click to paste the content of that looong file :)

5 Which Aliases
5 helpful aliases for using the which utility, specifically for the GNU which (2.16 tested) that is included in coreutils. Which is run first for a command. Same as type builtin minus verbosity $ alias which='{ command alias; command declare -f; } | command which --read-functions --read-alias' Which (a)lias $ alias whicha='command alias | command which --read-alias' Which (f)unction $ alias whichf='command declare -f | command which --read-functions' Which e(x)ecutable file in PATH $ alias whichx='command which' Which (all) alias, function, builtin, and files in PATH $ alias whichall='{ command alias; command declare -f; } | command which --read-functions --read-alias -a' # From my .bash_profile http://www.askapache.com/linux-unix/bash_profile-functions-advanced-shell.html


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