Commands by Skyrell (1)

What's this?

commandlinefu.com is the place to record those command-line gems that you return to again and again. That way others can gain from your CLI wisdom and you from theirs too. All commands can be commented on, discussed and voted up or down.

Share Your Commands


Check These Out

Watch movies in your terminal
requires mplayer

Click on a GUI window and show its process ID and command used to run the process
This command is useful when you want to know what process is responsible for a certain GUI application and what command you need to issue to launch it in terminal.

Which processes are listening on a specific port (e.g. port 80)
swap out "80" for your port of interest. Can use port number or named ports e.g. "http"

Rename all .jpeg and .JPG files to .jpg

See your current RAM frequency
man dmidecode [look for type]

Capitalize first letter of each word in a string - A ruby alternative
"-n" loops around ; "-e" executes the given quoted string ; "$_" is the current line ; "split" creates an array on white space; each item of the array is "collected" to be then "capitalized" ; the array is "joined" back into a string.

Do some learning...
Just realized how needless the 'ls' has been... This version is also multilingual, since there is no need to grep for a special key word ("nothing"/"nichts"/"rien"/"nada"...). And it makes use of all the available horizontal space.

Print every Nth line
Sometimes commands give you too much feedback. Perhaps 1/100th might be enough. If so, every() is for you. $ my_verbose_command | every 100 will print every 100th line of output. Specifically, it will print lines 100, 200, 300, etc If you use a negative argument it will print the *first* of a block, $ my_verbose_command | every -100 It will print lines 1, 101, 201, 301, etc The function wraps up this useful sed snippet: $ ... | sed -n '0~100p' don't print anything by default $ sed -n starting at line 0, then every hundred lines ( ~100 ) print. $ '0~100p' There's also some bash magic to test if the number is negative: we want character 0, length 1, of variable N. $ ${N:0:1} If it *is* negative, strip off the first character ${N:1} is character 1 onwards (second actual character).

Display _something_ when an X app fails
When you run an X program from a terminal you can see any errors. But when it's run from another X program (eg from a menu item, from your fluxbox 'keys' file etc) it might just die and you see nothing (except perhaps in .xsession-errors). Instead, launch it via this command and you'll see the termination status, stderr and stdout. eg: "xlaunch firefox" or "xlaunch 'echo stdout; echo stderr >&2; false'": 'echo stdout; echo stderr >&2; false' failed with error 1 STDERR: stderr STDOUT: stdout

Display IPs accessing your Apache webserver.


Stay in the loop…

Follow the Tweets.

Every new command is wrapped in a tweet and posted to Twitter. Following the stream is a great way of staying abreast of the latest commands. For the more discerning, there are Twitter accounts for commands that get a minimum of 3 and 10 votes - that way only the great commands get tweeted.

» http://twitter.com/commandlinefu
» http://twitter.com/commandlinefu3
» http://twitter.com/commandlinefu10

Subscribe to the feeds.

Use your favourite RSS aggregator to stay in touch with the latest commands. There are feeds mirroring the 3 Twitter streams as well as for virtually every other subset (users, tags, functions,…):

Subscribe to the feed for: