Commands by Stefan (1)

  • kpsewhich is a tool for path and file lookup. It is a front-end of the kpathsea library. For one or more given package or file names it returns the complete path from within the TeX installation, that one which the compiler would actually use. Via backticks we can use it as argument to less, more, or any editor. For example: gedit `kpsewhich hyperref.sty` Show Sample Output


    0
    less `kpsewhich scrartcl.cls`
    Stefan · 2012-04-15 11:10:41 0

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