Commands by ThomasHarlow (0)

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Set laptop display brightness
Run as root. Path may vary depending on laptop model and video card (this was tested on an Acer laptop with ATI HD3200 video). $ cat /proc/acpi/video/VGA/LCD/brightness to discover the possible values for your display.

Get a Bulleted List of SVN Commits By a User for a Specifc Day (Daily Work Log)
* Replace USERNAME with the desired svn username * Replace the first YYYY-MM-DD with the date you want to get the log (this starts at the midnight event that starts this date) * Replace the second YYYY-MM-DD with the date after you want to get the log (this will end the log scan on midnight of the previous day) Example, if I want the log for December 10, 2010, I would put {2010-12-10}:{2010-12-11}

list files recursively by size

Find usb device in realtime
Using this command you can track a moment when usb device was attached.

Remove all backup files in my home directory
I use this simple command for remove all backup files generated usually by editors like Vim and Emacs.

Which processes are listening on a specific port (e.g. port 80)
swap out "80" for your port of interest. Can use port number or named ports e.g. "http"

keep an eye on system load changes
helps you keep watch on the load of a system, without having to stare constantly at the terminal. The -d argument to watch highlights the difference from the last run, making it easier to note how the load is fluctuating. The sed command just strips off the information about how long the box has been up, and how many users are logged in.

To find the count of each open file on a system (that supports losf)

Python extract json

a fast way to repeat output a byte
the speed is about 500MB/s on my machine. i think it's fast enough to output not too many bytes. while a C program may output 1GB per sencond on my machine. if the size is not the power of 512,you may change the bs and count in dd.


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