Commands by TinaRodrigo (0)

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Change every instance of OLD to NEW in file FILE
Very quick way to change a word in a file. I use it all the time to change variable names in my PHP scripts (sed -i 's/$oldvar/$newvar/g' index.php)

make a log of a terminal session
Creates a log of a session in a file called typescript. Or specify the file with: $script filename Exit the session with control-d.

Get a list of ssh servers on the local subnet
--open -sV is not needed if you are only looking for hosts with 22 open

Convert mkv to SVCD/DivX
ffmpeg supports mkv

Join the content of a bash array with commas
This type of join is clearly documented in the bash manual. Only the first character of IFS is used for the delimiter.

Convert CSV to JSON
Replace 'csv_file.csv' with your filename.

print offsets of file disk for losetup/loop-mount
If you want to mount partitions of an disk image, you need the offsets and sizes of the partitions. This command prints them in the format that losetup understands.

Show top 50 running processes ordered by highest memory/cpu usage refreshing every 1s
http://alvinalexander.com/linux/unix-linux-process-memory-sort-ps-command-cpu for an overview of --sort available values

Network traffic on NICs in mbps without sar, iperf, etc...
Need output in mbps (bits) # ./bytes-second.sh eth0 eth0 interface maximum Speed: 1000Mb/s RX:12883212 TX:17402002 B/s | RX:98 TX:132 Mb/s RX:12371647 TX:17830111 B/s | RX:94 TX:136 Mb/s RX:12502750 TX:17860915 B/s | RX:95 TX:136 Mb/s

Write comments to your history.
A null operation with the name 'comment', allowing comments to be written to HISTFILE. Prepending '#' to a command will *not* write the command to the history file, although it will be available for the current session, thus '#' is not useful for keeping track of comments past the current session.


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