Commands by TommyTwoPuds (1)

  • Prints the path/filename and sparseness of any sparse files (files that use less actual space than their total size because the filesystem treats large blocks of 00 bytes efficiently). Uses a Tasker-esque field separator of more than one character to ensure uniqueness. Show Sample Output


    0
    find -type f -printf "%S=:=%p\n" 2>/dev/null | gawk -F'=:=' '{if ($1 < 1.0) print $1,$2}'
    TommyTwoPuds · 2019-02-06 14:12:32 0

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