Commands by TuxOtaku (11)

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Mount FileVault sparsebundle image manually (e.g.: from TimeMachine disk).

Hex math with bc
To do hex to binary: echo 'ibase=16; obase=2; 16*16' | bc # prints: 111100100 To do 16*16 from decimal to hex: echo 'ibase=10; obase=16; 16*16' | bc # prints: 100 You get the idea... Alternatively, run bc in interactive mode (see man page)

Reconstruct standard permissions for directories and files in current directory

Harder, Faster, Stronger SSH clients
We force IPv4, compress the stream, specify the cypher stream to be Blowfish. I suppose you could use aes256-ctr as well for cypher spec. I'm of course leaving out things like master control sessions and such as that may not be available on your shell although that would speed things up as well.

scping files with streamlines compression (tar gzip)
it compresses the files and folders to stdout, secure copies it to the server's stdin and runs tar there to extract the input and output to whatever destination using -C. if you emit "-C /destination", it will extract it to the home folder of the user, much like `scp file user@server:`. the "v" in the tar command can be removed for no verbosity.

Get listening ports on a localhost
ss is a tool that will help you to get all kinds of useful information about the current sockets on a localhost. You can also get the uid of the daemons process using the flag: $ ss -le

Print process run time, average CPU usage, and maximum memory usage on exit
Bash has a built-in time command which provides less functionality than the real time command. Thus we reference /usr/bin/time directly. Since the command isn't very easy to remember you could alias it to something like "cputime" or even just "time".

list block devices
Shows all block devices in a tree with descruptions of what they are.

Which processes are listening on a specific port (e.g. port 80)
swap out "80" for your port of interest. Can use port number or named ports e.g. "http"

coloured tail
tail with coloured output with the help of perl - need more colours? here is a colour table: http://www.tuxify.de/?p=23


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