Commands by UnixNeko (4)

  • PING parameters c 1 limits to 1 pinging attempt q makes the command quiet (or silent mode) /dev/null 2>&1 is to remove the display && echo ONLINE is executed if previous command is successful (return value 0) || echo OFFLINE is executed otherwise (return value of 1 if unreachable or 2 if you're offline yourself). I personally use this command as an alias with a predefined machine name but there are at least 2 improvements that may be done. Asking for the machine name or IP Escaping the output so that it displays ONLINE in green and OFFLINE in red (for instance).


    9
    ping -c 1 -q MACHINE_IP_OR_NAME >/dev/null 2>&1 && echo ONLINE || echo OFFLINE
    UnixNeko · 2012-02-09 06:30:55 7
  • Extracting .gz files and placing the output in another directory in one command line is convenient thing. I just followed some how-to to install Nagios on Ubuntu Lucid Lynx but they give the method to install from archives. I wished to install from the repository. If you do so some files are missing. I've not tested yet but this is an example command line I did to extract sudo sh -c 'gunzip -c /usr/share/doc/nagios3-common/examples/template-object/templates.cfg.gz > /etc/nagios3/objects/templates.cfg' We need privilege to write the destination file. Show Sample Output


    0
    sudo sh -c 'gunzip -c source.gz > destination'
    UnixNeko · 2011-07-05 23:51:01 1
  • Can be useful to rip a CD. Show Sample Output


    -1
    ripit -c 0 --outputdir $1 --nosubmission
    UnixNeko · 2011-06-12 12:29:26 0
  • I have some problems with gnome panel which does not load completely leaving me without the actual GUI. This commands helps to kill the gnome-panel process then it should be relaunch automatically.


    -2
    pgrep -lf gnome-panel | awk '{if ($2=="gnome-panel") print $1}' | xargs kill -9
    UnixNeko · 2011-06-12 12:23:27 3

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