Commands by Vasudev (4)

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Convert the contents of a directory listing into a colon-separated environment variable
Useful for making a CLASSPATH out of a list of JAR files, for example. Also: export CLASSPATH=.:$(find ./lib -name '*.jar' -printf '%p:')

Print a row of 50 hyphens
Get there by going backwards and forgetting the numbers.

Find writable files
Have a grudge against someone on your network? Do a "find -writable" in their directory and see what you can vandalize! But seriously, this is really useful to check the files in your own home directory to make sure they can't inadvertently be changed by someone else's wayward script.

Burn an audio CD.
My variation on an audio burning command from commandlinefu - this one doesn't crap out if you want to burn a CD in a directory whose permissions don't allow it, and instead rips everything to /tmp. If you mount your music partition like I do using Samba, you probably don't have write permission inside that file system in order to create the temporary directory other audio burning commands here use. Not a bad idea to add cdrom to your groups, and /bin/eject with visudo.

Remove invalid key from the known_hosts file for the IP address of a host
Quick shortcut if you know the hostname and want to save yourself one step for looking up the IP address separately.

Backup files older than 1 day on /home/dir, gzip them, moving old file to a dated file.
Useful for backing up old files, custom logs, etc. via a cronjob.

Watch the disk fill up with change highlighting
If you add the -d flag each difference in the command's output will be highlighted. I also monitor individual drives by adding them to df. Makes for a nice thin status line that I can shove to the bottom of the monitor.

Convert seconds to [DD:][HH:]MM:SS
Converts any number of seconds into days, hours, minutes and seconds. sec2dhms() { declare -i SS="$1" D=$(( SS / 86400 )) H=$(( SS % 86400 / 3600 )) M=$(( SS % 3600 / 60 )) S=$(( SS % 60 )) [ "$D" -gt 0 ] && echo -n "${D}:" [ "$H" -gt 0 ] && printf "%02g:" "$H" printf "%02g:%02g\n" "$M" "$S" }

Shell function to create a directory named with the current date, in the format YYYYMMDD.
Creates a directory named with the current date, in the format YYYYMMDD. If you give it a directory name as an argument, it will create the new directory inside the specified directory. This is an alternative to command #1993.

Multiple variable assignments from command output in BASH
It's quite easy to capture the output of a command and assign it in a shell's variable: $ day=$(date +%d) $ month=$(date +%m) But, what if we want to perform the same task with just one program invocation? Here comes the power of eval! date(1) outputs a string like "day=29; month=07; year=11" (notice the semicolons I added on purpose at date's custom output) which is a legal shell line. This like is then parsed and executed by the shell once again with the help of eval. Just setting 3 variables! Inspired by LinuxJournal's column "Dave Taylor's Work the Shell".


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