Commands by Vasudev (4)

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commandlinefu.com is the place to record those command-line gems that you return to again and again. That way others can gain from your CLI wisdom and you from theirs too. All commands can be commented on, discussed and voted up or down.

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Execute a command without saving it in the history
Prepending one or more spaces to your command won't be saved in history. Useful for pr0n or passwords on the commandline. Tested on BASH.

get all Google ipv4 subnets for a iptables firewall for example
a bit shorter, parenthesis not needed but added for clarity

Get info about a GitHub project
In this example we search for 'vim' but vim doesn't have a project on github right now. That's ok, this command still searches for every project that has 'vim' in their description (forks, plugins, etc). To get XML or JSON output just replace 'yaml' in the url with 'xml' or 'json'.

Temporarily suspend and unsuspend a foreground job
Press ^Z, do what you need to do on the shell, then input % to resurrect the suspended job.

list block devices
Shows all block devices in a tree with descruptions of what they are.

Get absolut path to your bash-script

Retrieve a random command from the commandlinefu.com API
Seeing that we get back plain text anyway we don't need lynx. Also the sed-part removes the credit line.

make, or run a script, everytime a file in a directory is modified
Uses inotifywait from inotify-tools ( http://wiki.github.com/rvoicilas/inotify-tools/ ), that is compatible only with linux. Usefull when you work with files that have to be compiled.. latex, haml, c..

check open ports without netstat or lsof

Add forgotten changes to the last git commit
It's pretty common to forgot to commit a files, be it a modification, or a brand new file. If you did forget something, git add the files you want, and then git commit --amend. It will essentially redo the last commit, with the changes you just added. It seeds the commit message with the last commit message by default. You probably shouldn't do this if you've already pushed the commit.


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