Commands by Vasudev (4)

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Produces a list of when your domains expire
Create a text file called domainlist.txt with a domain per line, then run the command above. All registries are a little different, so play around with the command. Should produce a list of domains and their expirations date. I am responsible for my companies domains and have a dozen or so myself, so this is a quick check if I overlooked any.

Yet Another Rename (bash function)
Implementation of `rename` for systems on which I don't have access to it.

Project your desktop using xrandr
HDMI-1 is the interface in the example, which can be obtained just by typing xrandr and surfing through the output. There are a hell lot of configurations that can be done but I prefer auto because it works in most cases. $ Lifesaver

prints message in given argument on on center of screen
$ function echox { echo `tput cup $(($(tput lines))) $(( ($(tput cols) - $(echo "${#1}"))/2 ))`"$1"`tput cup $(tput lines) $(( $(tput cols)-1 ))`; } echox prints given argument on bottom line center screen in terminal $ function echoxy { echo `tput cup $(($(tput lines)/2)) $(( ($(tput cols) - $(echo "${#1}"))/2))`"$1"`tput cup $(tput lines) $(( $(tput cols)-1 ))`; } exhoxy prints given argument center screen $ function echos { echo `tput cup $(($(tput lines)-2)) $(($(tput cols)-$(echo ${#1})))&&tput sc`"$1"`tput cup $(($(tput lines)-2)) 0 && tput rc`; } $ while [ 1 ]; do echos "`date`"; done echos prints date and time on second from last line (used as status message) you can easily use these functions by placing them in your .bashrc file, make sure to source your .bashrc once you do

Get the ip registered to a domain on OpenWRT
I use this in a script on my openwrt router to check if my DynDNS needs to be updated, saves your account from being banned for blank updates.

Write comments to your history.
A null operation with the name 'comment', allowing comments to be written to HISTFILE. Prepending '#' to a command will *not* write the command to the history file, although it will be available for the current session, thus '#' is not useful for keeping track of comments past the current session.

Convert seconds to [DD:][HH:]MM:SS
Converts any number of seconds into days, hours, minutes and seconds. sec2dhms() { declare -i SS="$1" D=$(( SS / 86400 )) H=$(( SS % 86400 / 3600 )) M=$(( SS % 3600 / 60 )) S=$(( SS % 60 )) [ "$D" -gt 0 ] && echo -n "${D}:" [ "$H" -gt 0 ] && printf "%02g:" "$H" printf "%02g:%02g\n" "$M" "$S" }

Which processes are listening on a specific port (e.g. port 80)
swap out "80" for your port of interest. Can use port number or named ports e.g. "http"

List all NPM global packages installed

Which processes are listening on a specific port (e.g. port 80)
swap out "80" for your port of interest. Can use port number or named ports e.g. "http"


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