Commands by Walter88 (0)

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Remove old unused kernels from Red Hat Enterprise Linux 5 & Fedora 12/13
Install using yum install yum-utils Options include: --oldkernels Remove old kernel and kernel-devel packages --count=KERNELCOUNT Number of kernel packages to keep on the system (default 2) use package-cleanup --help for a complete list

Show Apt/Dpkg configuration
Shows all configurations to apt and dpkg, rarely changed, you probably still have the default configuration. Go ahead and explore your configuration if you dare, perhaps change your apt-cache directory, Dir::Cache "var/cache/apt/"; or the names of the log files.

Rename files in batch

list block devices
Shows all block devices in a tree with descruptions of what they are.

Short Information about loaded kernel modules
Run this as root, it will be helpful to quickly get information about the loaded kernel modules.

Backup file, create dir and set perms in one shot
Prior to working on/modifying a file, use the 'install -m' command which can both copy files, create directories, and set their permissions at the same time. Useful when you are working in the public_html folder and need to keep the cp'd file hidden.

Which processes are listening on a specific port (e.g. port 80)
swap out "80" for your port of interest. Can use port number or named ports e.g. "http"

Perform a branching conditional
This will perform one of two blocks of code, depending on the condition of the first. Essentially is a bash terniary operator. To tell if a machine is up: $ ping -c1 machine { echo succes;} || { echo failed; } Because of the bash { } block operators, you can have multiple commands $ ping -c1 machine && { echo success;log-timestamp.sh }|| { echo failed; email-admin.sh; } Tips: Remember, the { } operators are treated by bash as a reserved word: as such, they need a space on either side. If you have a command that can fail at the end of the true block, consider ending said block with 'false' to prevent accidental execution

Use top to monitor only all processes with the same name fragment 'foo'
$ pgrep foo may return several pids for process foobar footy01 etc. like this: 11427 12576 12577 sed puts "-p " in front and we pass a list to top: $ top -p 11427 -p 12576 -p 12577

Filter out all blank or commented (starting with #) lines


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