Commands by Weboide (3)

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Title Case Files
All words of the filenames except "a", "of", "that" and "to" are capitalized. To also match words which begin with a specific string, you can use this: $ rename 's/\b((?!hello\b|t)[a-z]+)/\u$1/g' * This will capitalize all words except "hello" and words beginning with "t".

Quick plotting of a function
The arguments of "seq" indicate the starting value, step size, and the end value of the x-range. "awk" outputs (x, f(x)) pairs and pipes them to "graph", which is part of the "plotutils" package.

Print Asterisk phone logs
Prints a log of phonecalls placed from/to an asterisk server, formated into an easily readable table. You can use partial number/queue matches, or use .* to match everything.

Check SSH public and private keys matching
Tested in bash4

Get AWS temporary credentials ready to export based on a MFA virtual appliance
You might want to secure your AWS operations requiring to use a MFA token. But then to use API or tools, you need to pass credentials generated with a MFA token. This commands asks you for the MFA code and retrieves these credentials using AWS Cli. To print the exports, you can use: `awk '{ print "export AWS_ACCESS_KEY_ID=\"" $1 "\"\n" "export AWS_SECRET_ACCESS_KEY=\"" $2 "\"\n" "export AWS_SESSION_TOKEN=\"" $3 "\"" }'` You must adapt the command line to include: * $MFA_IDis ARN of the virtual MFA or serial number of the physical one * TTL for the credentials

Google Spell Checker
I took matthewbauer's cool one-liner and rewrote it as a shell function that returns all the suggestions or outputs "OK" if it doesn't find anything wrong. It should work on ksh, zsh, and bash. Users that don't have tee can leave that part off like this: $spellcheck(){ typeset y=$@;curl -sd "$y" https://google.com/tbproxy/spell|sed -n '/s="[1-9]"/{s/]*>/ /g;s/\t/ /g;s/ *\(.*\)/Suggestions: \1\n/g;p}';}

Display your ${PATH}, one directory per line
This works in bash and zsh. You may also want to alias it, if you need to look at it often... $ alias lpath="echo \$PATH | tr : \\\\n" "\$PATH" to make sure to look at your current $PATH

Find name of package which installed a given shell command
Some command names are very different from the name of the package that installed them. Sometimes, you may want to find out the name of the package that provided a command on a system, so that you can install it on another system.

Move items from subdirectories to current directory
Find every file and move it to current directory.

use mplayer to watch Apple Movie Trailer instead of quicktime player
http://trailers.apple.com/trailers/ just copy the .mov link and use mplayer to stream


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