Commands by Williebee (8)

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Get AWS temporary credentials ready to export based on a MFA virtual appliance
You might want to secure your AWS operations requiring to use a MFA token. But then to use API or tools, you need to pass credentials generated with a MFA token. This commands asks you for the MFA code and retrieves these credentials using AWS Cli. To print the exports, you can use: `awk '{ print "export AWS_ACCESS_KEY_ID=\"" $1 "\"\n" "export AWS_SECRET_ACCESS_KEY=\"" $2 "\"\n" "export AWS_SESSION_TOKEN=\"" $3 "\"" }'` You must adapt the command line to include: * $MFA_IDis ARN of the virtual MFA or serial number of the physical one * TTL for the credentials

Find the package that installed a command

pass the output of some command to a new email in the default email client
This depends on 'stripansi' and 'urlencode' commands, which exist on my system as these aliases: $ alias stripansi='perl -ple "s/\033\[(?:\d*(?:;\d+)*)*m//g;"' $ alias urlencode='perl -MURI::Escape -ne "\$/=\"\"; print uri_escape \$_"' The `open` command handles URLs on a Mac. Substitute the equivalent for your system (perhaps gnome-open). I don't use system `mail`, so I have this aliased as `mail` and use it this way: $ git show head | mail

ls -hog --> a more compact ls -l
I often deal with long file names and the 'ls -l' command leaves very little room for file names. An alternative is to use the -h -o and -g flags (or together, -hog). * The -h flag produces human-readable file size (e.g. 91K instead of 92728) * The -o suppresses the owner column * The -g suppresses the group column Since I use to alias ll='ls -l', I now do alias ll='ls -hog'

View all new log messages in real time with color
This will show all changes in all log files under /var/log/ that are regular files and don't end with `gz` nor with a number

currently mounted filesystems in nice layout
since fuse mounts do not appear in /etc/mtab (fuse can't write there, dunno if it would if it could) this is propably a better way.

list block devices
Shows all block devices in a tree with descruptions of what they are.

lists files and folders in a folder
lists files and folders in a folder with summary.

Search for a process by name
ps and grep is a dangerous combination -- grep tries to match everything on each line (thus the all too common: grep -v grep hack). ps -C doesn't use grep, it uses the process table for an exact match. Thus, you'll get an accurate list with: ps -fC sh rather finding every process with sh somewhere on the line.

useful tail on /var/log to avoid old logs or/and gzipped files
with discard wilcards in bash you can "tail" newer logs files to see what happen, any error, info, warn...


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