Commands by Zaphod (2)

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Change a specific value in a path
Awk replaces the value of a specific field while retaining the field separator "/" .

Update pandoc via cabal
An alternative to built-in package manager, keep pandoc in sync with upstream releases.

Verify/edit bash history command before executing it
Bash history commands are those that begin with the character ! (eg. the most popular 'sudo !!' Explained here => http://www.commandlinefu.com/commands/view/13). By default bash immediately executes the history command. Setting this shell option will make bash first allow you to verify/edit an history command before executing it. To set this option permanently, put this command in ~/.profile or ~/.bashrc file. To unset this option issue following command. $shopt -u histverify

Listing today’s files only

Send remote command output to your local clipboard
This command will copy command's output into your local clipboard

FizzBuzz One-liner

Get AWS temporary credentials ready to export based on a MFA virtual appliance
You might want to secure your AWS operations requiring to use a MFA token. But then to use API or tools, you need to pass credentials generated with a MFA token. This commands asks you for the MFA code and retrieves these credentials using AWS Cli. To print the exports, you can use: `awk '{ print "export AWS_ACCESS_KEY_ID=\"" $1 "\"\n" "export AWS_SECRET_ACCESS_KEY=\"" $2 "\"\n" "export AWS_SESSION_TOKEN=\"" $3 "\"" }'` You must adapt the command line to include: * $MFA_IDis ARN of the virtual MFA or serial number of the physical one * TTL for the credentials

Detect illegal access to kernel space, potentially useful for Meltdown detection
Based on capsule8 agent examples, not rigorously tested

Find the fastest server to disable comcast's DNS hijacking
Comcast is an ISP in the United States that has started hijacking DNS requests as a "service" for its customers. For example, in Firefox, one used to be able to do a quick "I'm Feeling Lucky" Google search by typing a single word into the URL field, assuming the word is not an existing domain when surrounded by www.*.com. Comcast customers never receive the correct NX (non-existent domain) error from DNS. Instead, they are shown a page full of advertising. There is a way to "opt out" from their service, but that requires having the account password and the MAC address of your modem handy. For me, it was easier just to set static DNS servers. But the problem is, which ones to choose? That's what this command answers. It'll show you the three _non-hijacked_ Comcast DNS servers that are the shortest distance away. Perhaps you don't have Comcast (lucky you!), but hopefully this command can serve as an example of using netselect to find the fastest server from a list. Note that, although this example doesn't show it, netselect will actually perform the uniq and DNS resolution for you. Requires: netselect, curl, sort, uniq, grep


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