Commands by Zath (2)

  • Improved google text-to-speech function. Allows to specify language, plays sound in terminal. Automatically removes downloaded file after successfully processing. Usage: say LANGUAGE TEXT Examples: say en "This is a test." say pl "To jest test"


    2
    function say { wget -q -U Mozilla -O google-tts.mp3 "http://translate.google.com/translate_tts?ie=UTF-8&tl=$1&q=$2" open google-tts.mp3 &>/dev/null || mplayer google-tts.mp3 &>/dev/null; rm google-tts.mp3; }
    Zath · 2014-08-01 23:43:16 0
  • Change current working directory with root permissions. Place this snippet in your .bashrc to add a new "sudocd" command: function sudocd { sudo bash -c "cd $1;bash" } Usage: sudocd DIRECTORY Please note that if you will use this command to cd into directories with the permissions allowing only root to be in them, you will have to use sudo as a prefix to every command that changes/does something in that directory (yes, even ls).


    0
    sudo bash -c "cd /PATH/TO/THE/DIRECTORY;bash"
    Zath · 2014-07-28 20:20:04 0

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